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Front: Bangor & Aroostook Railroad Back: Bangor & Aroostook Railroad B&A R.R. Flag

Bangor & Aroostook Railroad

Item: 3-B     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the M.M. Buck Co.
Superb stamp marks and patina. Attractive tapered barrel.
Different style bit than BAR key below.
13th street = Bangor Union Station now Amtrak.

History

The Bangor & Aroostook Railroad was a United States railroad company that brought rail service to Arostook County in northern Maine. Brightly painted BAR box cars attracted national attention in the 1950s. First-generation diesel locomotives operated on BAR until they were museum pieces. The economic downturn of the 1980s coupled with the departure of heavy industry from northern Maine forced the railroad to seek a buyer and end operations in 2003.

The company was incorporated in 1891 to combine the lines of the former Bangor & Piscataquis Railroad and the Bangor & Katahdin Iron Works Railway. It was based in Bangor & lines extended from there to Oakfield and Houlton in 1894.

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Front: Bangor & Aroostook Railroad Back: Bangor & Aroostook Railroad BAR advertisement poster

Bangor & Aroostook Railroad

Item: 4-B     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Adlake forged?
Nice serif lettering and gold patina.

History - continued from above

BAR began hauling potatoes in heated box cars in 1895. Potatoes provided a stable income source through the great depression, and provided 50% of the railroad's revenue following World War II. BAR had the 2nd largest United States railroad-owned reefer fleet (after Santa Fe) during the 1950s. BAR made an arrangement with Pacific Fruit Express whereby, PFE reefers shipped Maine potatoes during winter months and BAR reefers carried California produce during the summer and autumn. While potatoes started moving by truck following completion of the Interstate Highway System into northern Maine in the 1960s, what actually resulted in the railroad losing its potato business forever was the Penn Central Transportation Company (PC), whose interchange service became so bad during the winter of 1969-70 that a large portion of the 1969 potato crop was spoiled by freezing when car heaters ran out of fuel. The claims process against PC was not resolved prior to PC's bankruptcy declaration the following June. As a result, several potato farms went out of business; and those that survived distrusted rail service and never returned to using the railroad.

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Front: Bangor & Aroostook Railroad Back: Bangor & Aroostook Railroad B&A R.R. Flag

Bangor & Aroostook Railroad

Item: 5-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Adlake forged.
Nice lettering and gold patina.
Earlier issued BAR key, "A" = new series.

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Front: Barre & Chelsea Railroad Back: Barre & Chelsea Railroad Block of Granite    C.E. Tayntor & Co's Quarry

Barre & Chelsea Railroad

Item: 7-B     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. B&C onced owned by the B&M.
Superb serif lettering and two-tone patina.

History

The Barre Railroad Company was incorporated April 9, 1888, under general laws of Vermont to construct, maintain, and operate a railroad from the village of Barre to the granite quarries in said town of Barre and Williamstown, Vt. The date of organization was April 10, 1888.

The East Barre & Chelsea Railroad Company, the only predecessor, was incorporated July 20, 1892, under general laws of Vermont to construct and maintain a railroad from a point of connection with tracks of The Barre Railroad Company in the town of Barre, to East Barre, Vt. The date of organization was September 11, 1892.

The owned mileage was acquired partly by construction and partly by merger. The records reviewed indicate that 13.819 miles of road was constructed by The Barre Railroad Company during 1888-89, and 1.673 miles was acquired by merger from the East Barre & Chelsea Railroad Company, constructed by or for that company during 1891-92, or a total of 15.492 miles.

The majority of the Granite District was part of the Boston & Maine Railroad (B&M) system until 1926, when the Barre & Chelsea Railroad (Barre to Graniteville) and Montpelier & Wells River Railroad (Barre and Montpelier to Wells River) were sold to local interests. The latter was consolidated into the former in January 1945, but in 1957 the entire Barre & Chelsea Railroad was abandoned.

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Front: Bellingham & Northern Railway Back: Bellingham & Northern Railway CM&St.P R.R. Flag

Bellingham & Northern Railway

Item: 12-B     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Bohannan forged.
Nice serif lettering and gold patina.
Operated under the B&N name for only 10 years.
A very rare key!

History

Washington state's Bellingham Bay & British Colombia Railroad was chartered in 1890. Created by a group of businessmen in the town of New Whatcom, its main purpose was to provide service within Whatcom County to its many industries; which included lumber, coal and its many canneries along the Bellingham Bay waterfront.

The BB&BC became part of the Chicago Milwaukee St. Paul & Pacific in 1908; and in doing so, the Milwaukee Road renamed the BB&BC, the Bellingham & Northern Railway. By 1918, the Milwaukee Road had fully absorbed the Bellingham & Northern Railway into it's own lines.

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Front: Belt Railway Back: Belt Railway Chicago Belt R.R. Flag

Belt Railway of Chicago

Item: 13-B     Price: $25.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
FYI: a C&WI key will open an
Adlake Belt lock & vice-versa.

History

Chartered in 1882, the Belt Railway Company of Chicago (BRC), headquartered in Bedford Park, IL, is the largest switching terminal railroad in the United States. It is co-owned by six Class I railroads; BNSF Railway, Canadian National Railway, Canadian Pacific Railway, CSX Transportation, Norfolk Southern Railway, and Union Pacific Railroad, each of which uses the switching and interchange facilities of the BRC. Owner lines and other railroads bring their trains to the Belt Railway to be separated, classified, and re-blocked into new trains for departure. The BRC also provides rail terminal services to approximately 100 local manufacturing industries.

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Front: Belt Railway Back: Belt Railway BRC Clearing Yard

Belt Railway of Chicago

Item: 14-B     Price: $40.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

The Clearing Yard, located on the boundary between Chicago and Bedford Park, Illinois, just south of Chicago Midway International Airport, is one of the largest hump classification facilities in the United States. Some 5.5 miles in length and covering 786 acres the yard supports more than 250 miles (400 km) of track. It has six main subdivisions; one arrival, classification, and departure yard in the eastbound and westbound directions.

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Front: Belt Railway Back: Belt Railway How the West was Won

Belt Railway of Chicago

Item: 15-B     Price: $30.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and two-tone patina.

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Front: Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad Back: Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad B&LE R.R. Flag

Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad

Item: 16-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History

The Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad (BLE) is a class II railroad that operates in northwestern Pennsylvania and northeastern Ohio.The railroad's main route runs from the Lake Erie port of Conneaut, Ohio to the Pittsburgh suburb of Penn Hills, Pennsylvania, a distance of 139 miles. The original rail ancestor of the B&LE, the Shenango & Allegheny Railroad, began operation in October 1869.

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Front: Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad Back: Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad B&LE R.R.

Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad

Item: 17-B     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the Bohannan Co.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

History - continued from above

In 1988 the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad became part of Transtar, Inc., a privately held transportation holding company with principal operations in railroad freight transportation, dock operations, Great Lakes shipping, and inland river barging that were formerly subsidiaries of USX, the holding company that owns U.S. Steel. In 2001 the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad became part of Great Lakes Transportation, LLC. On May 10, 2004 Canadian National Railway acquired the Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad. Iron ore and coal are still the route's major freight commodities.

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Front: Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad Backside: Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad B&LE R.R. Flag

Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad

Item: 18-B     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

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Front: Beaver & Ellwood Railroad Back: Beaver & Ellwood Railroad PL&E R.R.Flag

Beaver & Ellwood Railroad Company

Item: 19-B     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s-early 1900s.
Fine pocket wear and nice gold patina.
Gobbled up by the P&LE in 1910.
Very rare key.

History

The Beaver & Ellwood Railroad Company was organized May 20, 1890. Known as the Beaver & Ellwood Railroad, the line provided passenger service to the Park Gate station, as well as freight service to Ellwood City industries. In April of 1892 The Ellwood Connecting Railroad was incorporated by the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie to make the connection to the Beaver & Ellwood Railroad but did not open until June of 1893. In May of 1899, the Beaver & Ellwood Railroad was leased to the P&LE for twenty years. On a side note, July of the same year, the Beaver & Ellwood Railroad acquired the Ellwood Southern Railroad Company.

Finally June 6, 1910 the P&LE purchased the entire issue of stock of the Beaver & Ellwood Railroad Company and merged it with the Ellwood Connecting Railroad Company in January 1911.

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Front: Boston & Albany Railroad Back: Boston & Albany Railroad B&M R.R. Flag

Boston & Albany Railroad

Item: 20-B     New Listing     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Nice pocket worn lettering a silver patina.

History

The Boston and Albany Railroad (reporting mark B&A) was a railroad connecting Boston, Massachusetts to Albany, New York, later becoming part of the New York Central Railroad system, Conrail, and CSX Transportation. The line is currently used by CSX for freight. Passenger service is still provided on the line by Amtrak, as part of their Lake Shore Limited service, and by the MBTA Commuter Rail system, which owns the section east of Worcester and operates it as its Framingham/Worcester Line.

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Front: Boston & Maine Railroad Back: Boston & Maine Railroad B&M R.R. Flag

Boston & Maine Railroad

Item: 21-B     Eastern Division     Price: $25.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s.
Great gold patina
Given the moniker, "Bashed and Maimed."

History

Chartered in 1836, the Boston & Maine Corporation, known as the Boston & Maine Railroad (B&M), was a former U.S. Class I railroad in northern New England. It became part of what is now the Pan Am Railways network in 1983.

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Front: Boston & Maine Railroad Back: Boston & Maine Railroad B&M rail yard

Boston & Maine Railroad

Item: 22-B     Eastern Division     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.
One of the few eastern lines that
wasn't consolidated into Conrail.

History - continued from above

B&M's earliest corporate predecessor was the Andover & Wilmington Railroad, opened in August 1836 from Andover, Massachusetts, south to a junction with the B&L at Wilmington, approximately 7 miles. The B&M grew for the most part by acquisition, not by construction. The oldest component of the B&M was the 25-mile route between Boston and Lowell, Massachusetts, opened by the Boston & Lowell Railroad (B&L) on June 24, 1835, but not acquired until much later. The B&M's 19th century history consists of four distinct routes

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Front: Boston & Maine Railroad Back: Boston & Maine Railroad train orders

Boston & Maine Railroad

Item: 23-B     New     Eastern Division     Listing     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

B&M dieselized quickly, except for suburban passenger trains, and it was an early user of Centralized Traffic Control. In 1950 it was a well-run, progressive railroad, in a region that was losing its heavy industry and beginning to build interstate superhighways. In 1956, Patrick B. McGinnis became president of the B&M, bringing in a new image, not just blue replacing maroon on the locomotives and cars but a new way of doing things: deficits, deferred maintenance, and kickbacks on the sale of B&M's streamlined passenger cars, which ultimately culminated in a prison sentence that ended his career in railroading.

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Front: Boston & Maine Railroad Back: Boston & Maine Railroad B&M R.R. Flag

Boston & Maine Railroad

Item: 24-B     New     Eastern Division     Listing     Price: $60.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Nice block lettering and gold patina.

History - continued from above

Rather than split B&M among its connections or ask for inclusion in Conrail, B&M's trustees decided to reorganize independently. Under the leadership of Alan Dustin, the B&M bought new locomotives, rebuilt its track, and changed its attitude. The revived B&M went after new business and expanded its operations. It sold the tracks and rolling stock to MBTA in 1975, but retained freight rights on those lines and continued to operate the trains for MBTA. In 1977 it assumed operation of commuter trains on the former NH and B&A lines out of Boston's South Station. In 1982 it bought several Conrail lines in Massachusetts and Connecticut and began operating coal trains and piggyback service.

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Front: Boston & Maine Railroad Back: Boston & Maine Railroad B&M No.38 James Hayward    B&M No.810

Boston & Maine Railroad

Item: 25-B     Eastern Division     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Bohannan forged.
Nice barrel accent ring and gold patina.

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Front: Boston & Maine Railroad Back: Boston & Maine Railroad B&M 4-6-2

Boston & Maine Railroad

Item: 26-B     Eastern Division     Price: $80.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Bohannan forged.
Nice barrel accent ring and gold patina.

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Front: Boston & Maine Railroad Back: Boston & Maine Railroad B&M R.R. No.115

Boston & Maine Railroad

Item: 27-B     Price: $20.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s. Padlock key.


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Front: Beaver-Meade & Englewood Railroad Back: Beaver-Meade & Englewood Railroad MKT R.R. Flag    BM&E caboose

Beaver-Meade & Englewood Railroad

Item: 32-B     post merger key     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.
Absorbed into the Katy in 1931.
Distinctive Katy style bit. Nice Okie oldie!
Given the moniker, "Butter, Milk and Eggs."

History

Feeling shunned that two major railroads, the Katy and Rock Island, had ignored the citizens of Beaver, OK, the Beaver-Meade & Englewood Railroad was created in order to save the town of Beaver. Construction started in 1912, and this first section was completed in 1915. Despite initial surveys beyond Forgan, however, the railroad never made it to Englewood or Meade, but rather ended up extending westward to a connection with the CRI&P at Hooker, OK in 1925. The BM&E ultimately made it as far west as Keyes (and a connection with the AT&SF) in 1931.

About this time, a legal battle was ensuing between the MKT and the CRI&P: they both wanted to purchase the BM&E due to its alignment through what was considered vast areas of lucrative agricultural production. MKT finally won out over the CRI&P, and absorbed the BM&E under its Northwestern District in 1931.

The MKT, struggling financially, did not maintain the tracks of the BM&E, being a seasonal line with intermittent and inconsistent profits. Due to the poor quality of the trackage and the high cost of maintaining it, the MKT decided to abandon the BM&E in its entirety, and did so on August 30, 1972. The small town of Beaver still exists to this day, not having been served by a railroad in 40 years.

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Front: Belfast & Moosehead Lake Railroad Back: Belfast & Moosehead Lake Railroad B&ML R.R. Flag

Belfast & Moosehead Lake Railroad

Item: 33-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Bohannan forged.
Nice block lettering and two-tone patina.

History

The Belfast & Moosehead Lake Railroad (reporting mark BML) was a standard-gauge shortline railroad that operated from 1871 to 2007 over a single-track grade from Belfast to Burnham Junction in Maine.

Chartered in 1867, the line was built between August 1868 and December 1870 by the Belfast & Moosehead Lake Railroad Company (B&MLRR), which was majority-owned by the city of Belfast until 1991. For its first 55 years, the road was operated under lease by the Maine Central as its Belfast Branch, which provided daily passenger and freight service to eight stations over the length of Waldo County, Maine. After the MEC cancelled its lease in 1925, the B&MLRR began running trains under its own name. Passenger operations ceased in March 1960, although in 1988, the railroad began operating summer tourist trains to offset a decline in freight traffic. In 1991, the city sold its interest in the money-losing railroad to private owners. In 2007, the railroad ended operations as the B&MLRR.

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Front: Beaver Dam Railroad Back: Beaver Dam Railroad Beaver Dam Tunnel

Beaver Dam Railroad

Item: 34-B     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Very different alloy used, which I believe to be "Nickel."
A very rare key in both make & name.

History

The Beaver Dam Railroad was a short-line railroad that operated in the U.S. states of Virginia and Tennessee in the early 20th century between the towns of Damascus, Virginia and Crandull, Tennessee. The line was abandoned in sections beginning in 1918 with portions still remaining in operation into the 1920s. Today, much of the old route is followed by Tennessee State Route 133.

The Backbone Rock tunnel was a short tunnel on the Beaver Dam Railroad's Tennessee section, blasted through in 1901 from a rock cliff that stood in the way of the railroad's progression. At only twenty-two feet in length, the tunnel was known locally as the "shortest tunnel in the world."

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Front: Belvidere Delaware Railroad Back: Belvidere Delaware Railroad BD R.R. Flag

Belvidere Delaware Railroad

Item 35-B     Price: $275.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s.
Forged by Romer & Co.
Great block lettering and dark patina.

History

The Belvidere-Delaware Railroad was chartered on March 2, 1836 and was constructed from Trenton along the Delaware River north to Belvidere, New Jersey. Beyond Belvidere, the line would connect to a proposed line that headed west to the Susquehanna River through Pennsylvania. The Trenton-Lambertville section opened on February 6, 1851, eventually reaching Belvidere on November 5, 1855.

The Belvidere Delaware Railroad and the Flemington Railroad & Transportation Company merged on February 16, 1885 to form the Belvidere Delaware Railroad.

In 1908 the PRR acquired trackage rights on the nearby Lehigh & Hudson River Railway (L&HR) and DL&W. The following year, the PRR shifted its railyard from Lambertville to Trenton. By the 1950s steam locomotives had been replaced with diesel operated self-propelled Doodlebugs as a cost-saving measure resulting from dwindling patronage, In August 1955, flood waters from the Delaware River caused by Hurricane Diane washed out portions of the line north of Belvidere near where the right-of-way crosses modern-day US Route 46, although the line still remains active south of this point to serve a chemical manufacturing plant. North of where the plant is now to the junction at Manunka Chunk was subsequently removed. On December 31, 1957, the Bel Del was merged into the United New Jersey Railroad & Canal Company, with passenger services ending by October 25, 1960.

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Front: Buffalo Creek & Gauley Railroad Back: Buffalo Creek & Gauley Railroad BC&G R.R. Flag

Buffalo Creek & Gauley Railroad

Item: 38-B     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Nice bold block lettering.
Attractive carmel patina.

History

The Buffalo Creek & Gauley Railroad (BC&G) was a railroad chartered on April 1, 1904 and ran along Buffalo Creek in Clay County, West Virginia. The original Buffalo Creek & Gauley ended service in 1965.

The BC&G was one of the last all-steam railroads, never operating a diesel locomotive to the day it shut down in 1965. Its primary purpose was to bring coal out of the mountains above Widen to an interchange with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Dundon.

After the BC&G ended operations in 1965 it was reactivated in 1971 by the Majestic Mining Company to serve a mine at Widen.The company used an Alco S-2 for power and the operation concluded in 1985. The line was then again reactivated in the mid-1990s when the Elk River Railroad, Inc. (TERRI) reopened the route to Avoca to serve a mine there. The operation lasted only a few years until 1999 when American Electric Power (AEP) determined the coal to be too poor in quality.

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Front: Buffalo & Lockport Railroad Backs Buffalo & Lockport Railroad NYC R.R. Flag

Buffalo & Lockport Railroad

Item: 41-B     Price: $200.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Great block lettering and gold patina. Key listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."
Early NYC aquisition.

History

The Buffalo & Lockport Railroad was chartered April 27, 1852, to build a branch of the Rochester, Lockport and Niagara Falls from Lockport towards Buffalo. It opened in 1854, running from Lockport to Tonawanda, where it joined the Buffalo & Niagara Falls Railroad, opened 1837, for the rest of the way to Buffalo. One of nine other railroads that formed the New York Central.

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Front: Back: Buffalo-New York & Philadelphia Railroad Pennsylvania R.R. Flag

Buffalo-New York & Philadelphia Railroad

Item: 42-B     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s. Very old and rare key.
Excellent stamp marks and gold patina.
BNY&P pre-dates WNY&P railroad.

History

Due to the Depression of the 1880's the Buffalo-New York & Philadelphia Railroad slid into receivership. J.P.Morgan, who was just establishing his
reputation as a financier, stepped in to sort out the mess. By 1887, he had reorganized BNY&P railroad as the Western New York & Pennsylvania Railroad.

The Buffalo-New York & Philadelphia Company is the only one of the great companies described which had its headquarters in Buffalo. Besides the roads consolidated with its own, the line controled at one time the following leased railroads: The Genesee Valley Canal Railroad; the Rochester-New York & Pennsylvania; the McKean & Buffalo; the Kendall & Eldred; the Olean & Bradford; and the Mayville Extension Railroad. The total number of miles of railroad owned and controlled by the company was seven hundred and eighteen.

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Front: Burlington Northern Railroad Back: Burlington Northern Railroad BN R.R. Flag

Burlington Northern Railroad

Item: 43-B     Price: $25.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1900s. KeLine forged.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.
Given the moniker,"Big Nothing."

History

The Burlington Northern Railroad was the product of a March 2, 1970, merger of four major railroads, the Great Northern Railway, Northern Pacific Railway, Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railway and the Chicago-Burlington & Quincy Railroad, as well as a few small jointly owned subsidiaries owned by the four. The merged railroad was initially going to be called Great Northern Pacific & Burlington Lines.

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Front: Burlington Northern Railroad Back: Burlington Northern Railroad Burlington Northern locomotives

Burlington Northern Railroad

Item: 44-B     Price: $25.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

Although the four railroads shared common ownership (including the headquarters building in Saint Paul, Minnesota) from the days of the James J. Hill era, the four railroads previously had unsuccessfully attempted four mergers to unify the Hill Lines: 1896, 1901, 1927 and 1955. Surprisingly the merger was finally approved in 1970 even though a challenge occurred in the Supreme Court, which reversed the result of the 1904 Northern Securities ruling.

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Front: Burlington Northern Railroad Back: Burlington Northern Railroad BN R.R. Flag

Burlington Northern Railroad

Item: 45-B     M = post merger key    Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

To further expand the Burlington Northern railroad, a single track was constructed in 1972 into the Powder River Basin to serve various coal mines. On November 21, 1980, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway was acquired, giving the railroad trackage as far south into Florida. By 1981, however, the holding company of the railroad, Burlington Northern, Inc. relocated headquarters from Saint Paul, Minnesota to Seattle, Washington and spun off all non-rail operations to Burlington Resources in 1988.

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Front: Back: Burlington Northern Railroad BN alt=    BN RR Flag    BN helper/pusher engines 682, 816, & 808

Burlington Northern Railroad

Item: 46-B     Price: $30.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and patina.

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Front: Back: Burlington Northern Railroad BN R.R. Flag

Burlington Northern Railroad

Item: 47-B     Price: $48.00

Remarks: BN high security steel key.


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Front: BNSF Railway Back: BNSF Railway BNSF R.R. Flag

Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway

Item: 48-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900s. KeLine forged.
Attractive block lettering and patina.
This key + key below = nice set!
BN style bit.

History

The creation of BNSF started with the formation of a holding company on September 22, 1995. This new holding company purchased the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (often called the "Santa Fe") and Burlington Northern Railroad, and formally merged the railways into the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway on December 31, 1996. On January 24, 2005, the railroad's name was officially changed to BNSF Railway Company using the initials of its original name.

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Front: BNSF Railway Back: BNSF Railway BN & AT&SF locomotives

Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway

Item: 49-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900s. KeLine forged.
Attractive block lettering and patina.
This key + key above = nice set!
Santa Fe style bit.

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Front: Burlington Route Railroad Back: Burlington Route Railroad BR R.R. Flag

Burlington Route Railroad

Item: 50-B     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and silver patina.
This key + BR key below = nice set.

History

The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (reporting mark CBQ) was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. Commonly referred to as the Burlington Route, the Burlington or as the Q, it operated extensive trackage in the states of Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and also in New Mexico and Texas through subsidiaries Colorado and Southern Railway, Fort Worth and Denver Railway, and Burlington-Rock Island Railroad

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Front: Burlington Route Railroad Back: Burlington Route Railroad BR Chicago 12th St. Yard

Burlington Route Railroad

Item: 51-B     New Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and silver patina.
Different style cut than key above.
This key + BR key above = nice set.

History

The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (reporting mark CBQ) was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. Commonly referred to as the Burlington Route, the Burlington or as the Q, it operated extensive trackage in the states of Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and also in New Mexico and Texas through subsidiaries Colorado and Southern Railway, Fort Worth and Denver Railway, and Burlington-Rock Island Railroad

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Front: Burlington Route Railroad Back: Burlington Route Railroad CB&Q engine No.3715

Burlington Route Railroad

Item: 52-B     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Early CB&Q key.
Attractive block lettering and gold patina.
Same style cut as BR key above.
This key + BR key above = nice set.

History - continued from above

The earliest predecessor of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, the Aurora Branch Railroad, was chartered by act of the Illinois General Assembly on October 2, 1848. The charter was obtained by citizens of Aurora and Batavia, Illinois, who were concerned that the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad would bypass their towns in favor of West Chicago on its route; at the time, that was the only line running west from Chicago.

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Front: Burlington Route Railroad Back: Burlington Route Railroad Burlington Route

Burlington Route Railroad

Item: 53-B     Price: $40.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.

Click on image to view larger picture




Front: Burlington Route Railroad Back: Burlington Route Railroad CB&Q Railroad

Burlington Route Railroad

Item: 54-B     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and gold patina.

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Front: Burlington Route Railroad Back: Burlington Route Railroad Burlington Route

Burlington Route Railroad

Item: 55-B     Repair Track     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s.
Early A&W hex stamp = 1st series.
Very nice block lettering and gold patina.
A rare 1!

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Front: Burlington & Missouri River Railroad Back: Burlington & Missouri River Railroad B&MR R.R. Flag

Burlington & Missouri River Railroad

Item: 57-B     Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Nice block lettering and silver patina.
Distinctive Burlington style bit.

History

The Burlington & Missouri River Railroad (B&MR) was an American railroad company incorporated in Iowa in 1852, with headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska. It was developed to build a railroad across the state of Iowa and began operations in 1856. It was acquired by the Chicago-Burlington & Quincy Railroad in 1872, and kept serving as its subsidiary.

The Burlington & Missouri River Railroad was incorporated in Burlington, Iowa in 1852. It commenced operations on January 1, 1856 with only a few miles of track. In 1857 it connected to Ottumwa, followed by Murray in 1858. It finally reached the Missouri River in November 1859. It used wood-burning locomotives and wooden passenger cars

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Front: Burlington & Missouri River Railroad Back: Burlington & Missouri River Railroad B&MR Ry crew    B&MR Railway crew

Burlington & Missouri River Railroad

Item: 58-B     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and silver patina.
Nicely preserved Missouri River keys
like this key, and key above are rare.

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Front: B&O Columbus & Newark Route Back: B&O Columbus & Newark Route Pennsylvania R.R. Flag        B&O RR Flag

Baltimore & Ohio

Item: 59-B     Columbus-Newark Route key    Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Elongated barrel.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The rails heading east from Columbus to Newark, Ohio were jointly owned by the "Pennsylvania Railroad" and the "Baltimore & Ohio Railroad." This 33 mile stretch was a bit like the waist of an hour glass. At the Newark end PRR trains from Steubenville - Pittsburgh and B&O trains from Wheeling - Pittsburgh shared the track. From the west at Columbus PRR trains from Cincinnati, St. Louis and Chicago came together on the Columbus-Newark Sub-Division along with B&O trains from Midland City-Cincinnati.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B&O R.R. Flag

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 60-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and copper patina.
Elegant elongated barrel.
"B" series + "C" series key below = nice set!

History

The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, based in Baltimore, Maryland, was one of the two or three oldest, largest, most important railroads in the history of the mid-Atlantic region. Its great rival was the Pennsylvania Railroad. The B&O was the first Class I railroad in the U.S. as well as one of the first in the nation. During its peak years, the railroad carried coal, steel, and other freight, as well as passengers, as far North as New York City, and as far west as Chicago. Most surviving trackage is operated by CSX Transportation. The B&O provided critical logistic support to the Union during the Civil War, when it was the target of repeated Confederate raids.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Tom Thumb locomotive

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 61-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.
Elegant elongated barrel.
"C" series + "B" series key above = nice set!

History - continued from above

The B&O was not the first railroad in the U.S., but it was the first common carrier railroad and the first to offer scheduled freight and passenger service to the public. It was the first intercity railroad in the United States. The most important American East Coast seaports in the early 1800s were Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Charleston, South Carolina. Baltimore had an advantage in being farther inland than the others (and therefore closer to many markets), being located almost at the head of navigation on Chesapeake Bay, the estuary of the Susquehanna River. New York gained an advantage in 1825 with the opening of the Erie Canal, permitting navigation as far as Lake Erie, and in 1826 the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania chartered a system of canals to link Philadelphia with the Ohio River at Pittsburgh.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. B&O R.R. Flag

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co.

Item: 62-B     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Fraim/Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
Elegant elongated barrel.

History - continued from above

In 1960 the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway (C&O) began to acquire B&O stock. NYC made a bid, but B&O's stockholders approved C&O control, and on May 1, 1962, so did the ICC. By early 1964 C&O owned 90% of B&O's stock. In 1967 the ICC authorized C&O and B&O to control WM; B&O's WM stock had long been held in a nonvoting trust. On June 15, 1973, B&O, C&O, and WM were made subsidiaries of the newly created Chessie System, although they continued to operate as separate railroads. There was no great surge of track abandonment, because in most areas B&O and C&O were complementary rather than competitive. In 1981 B&O leased the former Rock Island trackage from Blue Island to Henry, Illinois. B&O continued to exist with the Chessie System. On May 1, 1983, B&O assumed operations of the WM. Four years later, on April 30, 1987, C&O merged B&O, and four months after that, CSX Transportation merged the C&O.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. B&O R.R. - Roundhouse

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 63-B     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Fraim forged?
Nice serif lettering and gold patina.
Given the moniker, "Backward and Obsolete."

History - continued from above

The B&O was the target of repeated Confederate attacks during the American Civil War. Union forces often failed to properly secure the region, despite the vital importance of the railroad in providing supplies and troops to the battlefronts. Confederate general "Stonewall" Jackson made the Railroad his favorite target. Nevertheless, under the leadership of president John W. Garrett the B&O increased its operations, and increased its profits during the war.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. B&O R.R. Flag

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co.

Item: 64-B     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim/Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and copper patina.
Given the moniker,"Best and Only."

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Front: Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B&O Railroad depot, Pittsburg

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 65-B     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Nice accent ring.
Superb cursive lettering and patina.
Different but nice!

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B&O R.R. Flag

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 66-B     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s. F/S Hdw. forged?
Attractive serif lettering and patina.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B&O Lift Bridge

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co.

Item: 67-B     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Slaymaker forged.
Nice lettering and dark patina.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B&O R.R.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 71-B     Chicago Terminal     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Forged by the F-S Hdw. Co.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

History

In 1910 the B&O purchased the Chicago Terminal Transfer Co., a belt line and renamed this
section of it's line the Baltimore & Ohio - Chicago Terminal. In 1910, the B&O
absorbed this line and continued to use the CTT's key style.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B&O Jay St. freight station

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 72-B     Chicago Terminal     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and carmel patina.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad LS Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad LS B&O RR System Map

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 75-B     local station key     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Handsome - slim elongated barrel. Superb serif
lettering and dark patina.
A nice 1!

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad LS Back: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad LS B&OCT-Bascule Bridge

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

Item: 76-B     New     local station key     Listing     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Slaymaker forged.
Superb large serif lettering and patina.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railway Back: Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railway B&O R.R. Flag

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railway

Item: 77-B     Price: $295.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s-early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and patina. Key listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."
A rare one!

History

Originally the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad, the railroad was renamed Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railroad in 1889. Merged into the Baltimore & Ohio in 1900.

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Front: Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railway Back: Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railway B&O train, Ohio

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railway

Item: 78-B     post merger key     Price: $200.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
A rare one!

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Front: Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway Back: Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway BR&P R.R. Flag

Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway

Item: 80-B     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and patina.This key stamped
RY + BR&P key below stamped RR = nice set.

History

Chartered in 1869, the BR&P, a former class 1 railroad, aquired a reputation as a coal hauler line. In 1932 the Baltimore & Ohio purchased the BR&P. Fast forward to 1973, the C&O created the Chessie System who then sold the Rochester branch to the Genesee & Wyoming Railroad in 1986. Thus creating the Rochester & Southern Railroad. In April 1988 the remainder of the BR&P became the Buffalo & Pittsburgh Railroad, also a G&W subsidiary. Except for several branches, the lines of the BR&P of 1930 remain intact.

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Front: Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad Back: Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad BR&P Ry

Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad

Item: 81-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina. This key stamped
RR + BR&P key above stamped RY = nice set.

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Front: Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad Back: Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad BR&P Ry

Buffalo-Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad

Item: 82-B     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the Bohannan Co.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina. Given the moniker,
"Bums, Robbers and Pickpockets."

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Dates quoted for keys are approximate dates. Railroad switch keys initials (reporting mark) are assumed to be correct and accurate.
Comments on any railroad initials origin, including (typos), are welcome. Last update 07/02/2021

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