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Front Side: Wabash Railroad Backside: Wabash Railroad Wabash R.R. Flag

Wabash Railroad

Item: 3-W     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the Fraim/Slaymaker Co.
Superb dark serif lettering and patina.

History

The Wabash Railroad was a Class I railroad that operated in the mid-central United States. It served a large area, including track in the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, and Missouri and the province of Ontario.

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Frontside: Wabash Railroad Backside: Wabash Railroad Wabash locomotive

Wabash Railroad

Item: 4-W     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Nice bold block lettering and patina. This key
stamped "RR" + key below stamped "RY" = nice set.

History - continued from above

The Wabash Railroad's history, like that of many large U.S. railroads, is one of mergers, consolidations, and leases, though it seems to have gone through more reorganizations and name changes than most railroads its size. The oldest part of the Wabash was the Northern Cross Railroad, chartered in 1837 to run from Quincy, Illinois, east to the Indiana state line. The line, completed in 1858, required a ferry crossing of the Missouri River at St. Charles, 19 miles from St. Louis, until a bridge was completed in 1871. In the 1860's the railroad acquired a branch to Brunswick; the town of Moberly was established at the junction and became the location of the railroad's shops. The Brunswick line was extended to Kansas City in 1868.

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Frontside: Wabash Railway Backside: Wabash Railway Wabash locomotive No.2800

Wabash Railway

Item: 5-W     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Nice bold block lettering and copper patina. This key
stamped "RY" + key above stamped "RR" = nice set.

History - continued from above

In 1898 Wabash acquired trackage rights from Detroit through southern Ontario to Buffalo, New York, over the rails of the Grand Trunk Railway. The Canadian portion of the Wabash was connected with the rest of the system by ferries across the Detroit River between Detroit and Windsor. A line from Butler to New Haven, Indiana, east of Fort Wayne, was opened in 1902, allowing Detroit-St. Louis trains to be routed through Fort Wayne, Huntington and Wabash, Indiana.

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Frontside: Wabash Railroad Backside: Wabash Railroad NS/Wabash engine No.1070

Wabash Railroad

Item: 6-W     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Nice stamp marks and silver patina.

History - continued from above

By March 31, 1970, N&W acquired control from the Pennsylvania Company; by the end of 1980 N&W had almost complete ownership of the Wabash. The N&W and the Southern Railway merged in 1982, although the N&W continued to exist on paper. The Norfolk Southern formally merged the Wabash into the N&W in November 1991.

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Frontside: Wabash Railroad Backside: Wabash Railroad Wabash F7A engines

Wabash Railroad

Item: 7-W     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Adlake forged.
Great block lettering and gold patina.


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Frontside: Washburn-Bayfield & Iron River Railway Backside: Washburn-Bayfield & Iron River Railway NP R.R. Flag

Washburn-Bayfield & Iron River Railway

SOLD     New Listing     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s. Minnesota logging line.
Nice stamp marks and gold patina.
Very rare key, which are few in existence.

History

The Washburn, Bayfield & Iron River Railway has its beginnings in 1895 when ex-Senator Dwight M. Sabin of Minnesota persuaded the Bayfield County Board and other influential citizens that that the county needed its own railroad. The four sections between Washburn and Iron River were completed, the golden spike being driven at noon on May 1, 1898 and service began on July 8, 1898.

Late in the century, three logging mills were started. The home grown Washburn-Bayfield & Iron River Railway was purchased by the Northern Pacific Railroad to gain access to the City's lucrative traffic base. The City's source of raw materials was augmented by the rafting of logs across the bay from surrounding lands as well.

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Frontside: Wilkes-Barre Connecting Railroad Backside: Wilkes-Barre Connecting Railroad Wilkes-Barre & Eastern R.R.    Wilkes-Barre Connecting R.R. Bridge.    Wilkes-Barre & Eastern R.R.

Wilkes-Barre Connecting Railroad

Item: 14-W     Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina.

History

The Wilkes-Barre Connecting Railroad was incorporated at the end of 1912, and construction began in 1913. It was formed for the joint benefit of the D&H and the Pennsylvania Railroads. Norfolk Southern formally took over operations of the line from Schenectady south and west to Sunbury, replacing the Canadian Pacific as operator.

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Frontside: Wind Gap & Delaware Railroad Backside: Wind Gap & Delaware Railroad Knuckle coupling

Wind Gap & Delaware Railroad

Item: 15-W     Price: $200.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the Eagle Lock Co.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.
Subsidiary of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co.

History

The Lehigh and Lackawanna Railroad and its leased Wind Gap and Delaware Railroad were operated by the Central Railroad of New Jersey until February 1, 1905, when the two companies were merged into the L&NE. Around the same time the L&NE acquired the Northampton Railroad. This gave the L&NE a branch to Bethlehem, with a branch off that one to Martins Creek. Part of the main line between Benders Junction (the crossing of the original L&NE and the L&L) and Pen Argyl was abandoned in 1905, with the new route using the L&L and WG&D.

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Frontside: Wisconsin Central Railroad Backside: Wisconsin Central Railroad WC R.R. Flag

Wisconsin Central Railway

Item: 17-W     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. This key stamped
"RY" + WC key below stamped "RR" = nice set!

History

The original Wisconsin Central Railroad Company was established by an act of the Wisconsin State Legislature and incorporated in February 1871. It built track throughout Wisconsin, connecting to neighboring states, before being leased to Northern Pacific Railway between 1889-1893. It became the Wisconsin Central Railway Company in 1897, and back to Wisconsin Central Railroad Company in 1954. The railroad was merged into the Soo Line Railroad in 1961.

The Wisconsin Central's existence as an independent carrier was short-lived. Much of the Wisconsin Central right of way was built over land obtained through a Federal land-grant. It was the only land-grant railroad in Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Central Railway's tracks reached Ashland in 1877, St. Paul in 1884, Chicago in 1886 and Superior in 1908. The line was leased from 1889-1893 by the Northern Pacific Railroad. The lease was terminated when the Northern Pacific declared bankruptcy during the Panic of 1893. After a proposed merger with the Northern Pacific fell through in 1908, the Wisconsin Central was leased by the Minneapolis-St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway, commonly known as the Soo Line, in 1908. Controlling interest in the Soo Line (along with the Wisconsin Central) was held by the Canadian Pacific Railroad. The Wisconsin Central entered receivership in 1932, declared bankruptcy in 1944, and finally re-emerged from administration in 1954 as the Wisconsin Central Railroad. The Wisconsin Central was entirely merged into the new Soo Line Railroad in 1961.

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Frontside: Wisconsin Central Railroad Backside: Wisconsin Central Railroad WC 7495

Wisconsin Central Railroad

Item: 18-W     Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s-early 1900s. Tapered barrel.
Superb serif lettering and copper-gold patina. This key stamped
"RR" + WC key above stamped "RY" = nice set!

History - continued from above

While under the control of the Northern Pacific, the Wisconsin Central Railroad constructed Solon Spencer Beman's great Romanesque Grand Central Station (Chicago) in 1889 as its southern terminus. When the Northern Pacific defaulted on its lease terms in 1893, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad acquired the several Chicago properties of the Wisconsin Central including Grand Central Station.

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Frontside: Wisconsin Central & Fox Valley Western Railroad Backside: Wisconsin Central & Fox Valley Western Railroad WC R.R. Flag

Wisconsin Central Lines & Fox Valley Western Railroad

Item: 20-W     Price: $20.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900s. KeLine forged.
Nice stamp marks and gold patina.

History

The Fox River Valley Railroad was a short-lived railroad in eastern Wisconsin from 1988 to 1993 with about 214 miles of track, all of which was former Chicago & North Western Railway trackage. The line ran from Green Bay, Wisconsin to the north side of Milwaukee. Owned by the Itel Rail Corporation, FRV had problems already at start-up, plagued with big debt and little revenue. It was eventually absorbed by the Wisconsin Central along with sister railroad Green Bay & Western on August 28, 1993, as a subsidiary, Fox Valley & Western Ltd.

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Frontside: Willacoochee & DuPont Railroad Backside: Willacoochee & DuPont Railroad 1926 silent comedy film The General   1926 silent comedy film The General

Willacoochee & DuPont Railroad

Item: 22-W     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.

History

The Willacoochee & DuPont Railroad of Georgia, was a 10 mile short line that ran from Willacoochee to Shaw's Still. When exactly this railroad was chartered is unclear.

In 1915, when the Henderson Lumber Company acquired the Ocilla, Pinebloom, & Valdosta Railway, it ran from Gladys to Shaw's Still. In 1918, the Willacoochee & DuPont Railroad purchased the line and reportedly abandoned the tracks between Gladys and Willacoochee the following year (or used them only for logging or hauling naval stores and turpentine). It continued to operate the eastern and southern section of track from Willacoochee to Shaws Still, but apparently was not able to extend the line past Shaws Still to DuPont, a town on the Atlantic Coast Line in Clinch County. In 1922, this track too was abandoned.

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Frontside: West Jersey & Seashore Railroad Backside: West Jersey & Seashore Railroad PRR Flag

West Jersey & Seashore Railroad

Item: 25-W     Price: $215.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. A rare 1!
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The West Jersey and Seashore Railroad was a Pennsylvania Railroad subsidiary that became part of Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines in 1933.

The West Jersey Railroad (WJ) was granted its charter by the state of New Jersey on February 5, 1853 to build a line from Camden, New Jersey to Cape May, New Jersey. The line was then built with the backing of the C&A from Camden to Glassboro. The first 8.2 miles of the line used the abandoned right-of-way built by the Camden and Woodbury Railroad. The line was completed in 1863. In that year the WJ directors decided to build a line to Bridgeton NJ, and later build the line from Glassboro to Millville and Cape May. The right of way is now South Jersey/Philadelphia Shared Assets Operations Vineland Secondary freight rail line.

On November 2, 1932, the PRR and Reading Company (RDG) merged their southern New Jersey railroad lines into one company, the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines (PRSL). Duplicative lines were abandoned as part of the consolidation.

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Frontside: Western Maryland Railroad Backside: Western Maryland Railroad WM R.R. Flag

Western Maryland Railroad

SOLD     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s. Fraim forged.
Superb block lettering and patina.

History

Chartered in 1852, the Western Maryland Railway was an American Class I railroad which operated in Maryland, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. It was primarily a coal hauling and freight railroad, with a small passenger train operation. The WM became part of the Chessie System in 1973, although it continued independent operations until May 1975 after which time many of its lines were abandoned in favor of parallel Baltimore & Ohio Railroad lines. In 1983 it was fully merged into the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad.

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Frontside: Western Maryland Railroad Backside: Western Maryland Railroad WM Ry No.81

Western Maryland Railroad

SOLD     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s. Elongated barrel.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

Gradually, B&O absorbed WM's operations, and in late 1983, B&O officially merged the WM. The B&O itself merged with the C&O in 1987, which itself became part of CSX Transportation.

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Frontside: Western Maryland Co Backside: Western Maryland Co Western Maryland double header    WM locomotive No.1107

Western Maryland Co

SOLD     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Adlake forged?
Nice block lettering and carmel patina.

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Frontside: Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad Backside: Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad W&LE R.R. Flag

Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad

Item: 32-W     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Nice block lettering and two-tone patina.
The original W&LE operated 1877-1949

History

The Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway was a Class I railroad mostly within the U.S. state of Ohio. It was leased to the New York-Chicago and St. Louis Railroad (NKP) in 1949, and merged into the Norfolk & Western Railway in 1988. A new regional railroad reused the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway name in 1990 when it acquired most of the former W&LE from the N&W.

With investment by railroad financier Jay Gould in 1880 and financial reorganization, the line was converted to standard gauge and construction began again. Service from Huron to Massillon, Ohio, was opened on January 9, 1882, and new lines were constructed that eventually reached the Ohio River and Toledo. The W&LE also developed new docks on Lake Erie at Huron that opened May 21, 1884, when the first cargo of iron ore was received.

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Frontside: Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad Backside: Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad W&LE R.R.    W&LE Bobber Caboose

Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad

Item: 33-W     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Bohannan forged.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

At the end of 1944, W&LE operated 507 miles of road and 1003 miles of track; that year it reported 2371 million net ton-miles of revenue freight and 0.002 million passenger-miles.

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Frontside: Western New York & Pennsylvania Railroad Backside: Western New York & Pennsylvania Railroad WNY&P R.R. Flag

Western New York & Pennsylvania Railroad

Item: 35-W     Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s-early 1900s.
Superb block and gold patina. Not to be
associated with today's WNY&P Railroad.

History

The Western New York & Pennsylvania Railway was a railroad in the U.S. states of New York and Pennsylvania. Incorporated in 1887 as the Western New York & Pennsylvania Railroad from the reorganization of the Buffalo-New York & Philadelphia, and reorganized in 1895 as the Western New York & Pennsylvania Railway, it was acquired and leased by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1900 and merged into the Penndel Company in 1955.

The 1895 to 1899 period saw revenue inadequate to pay the bond interest, and this was contemporaneous with the Pennsylvania's need to expand into western New York. Moreover, this expansion did not raise competitive issues with the Pennsy's principal rival, the New York Central. Thus, on 1 August 1900, the WNY&PRY signed an agreement with the PRR under which the latter operated the former. Although the WNY&PRY did not generate much profit in this arrangement, it did improve matters for the Allegheny Valley and the Philadelphia and Erie roads, so the net result was satisfactory to the Pennsylvania. Eventually, the Western New York & Pennsylvania Railway became the Pennsylvania's Buffalo & Allegheny Valley Division.

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Frontside: Western Railway of Alabama Backside: Western Railway of Alabama Early 6 wheeler

Western Railway of Alabama

Item: 36-W     Price: $375.00

Remarks: ca. 1800s. Forged by T. Slaight.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
Nice southern relic!

History

The Western Railway of Alabama (WRA) also seen as "WofA" was created as the Western Railroad of Alabama by the owners of the Montgomery & West Point Railroad (M&WP) in 1860. It was built to further the M&WP's development West from Montgomery, Alabama to Selma, Alabama. When the line was constructed in 1870, the M&WP was merged into the WRA, creating a line from Selma to West Point, Georgia. It served Auburn, Alabama and connected in Opelika, Alabama to the Central of Georgia line from Columbus, Georgia to Birmingham, Alabama. Although it was partially owned by the Central of Georgia around the turn from the nineteenth to the twentieth century, it did not end up being owned by Norfolk Southern when that company came into existence due to the merger of the CofG's parent, the Southern Railway, and the Norfolk & Western Railway.

In the 1980s, the line and its sister railroads, the Atlanta & West Point Railroad and the Georgia Railroad, became part of the Family Lines System, along with the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad, the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and the Clinchfield Railroad. The lines were all later renamed Seaboard System Railroad, which in 1986 merged with the Chessie System to become CSX Transportation.

The WRA still sees regular freight service. Passenger service ceased January 7, 1970.

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Frontside: West Virginia Central & Pittsburg Railway Backside: West Virginia Central & Pittsburg Railway WM R.R. Flag

West Virginia Central & Pittsburg Railway

Item: 37-W     Price: $175.00

Remarks: Absorbed in the WM in 1902.
Nice serif lettering and carmel patina.

History

The West Virginia Central and Pittsburg Railway (WVC&P) was a railroad in West Virginia and Maryland operating in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It had main lines radiating from Elkins, West Virginia in four principal directions: north to Cumberland, Maryland; west to Belington, WV; south to Huttonsville, WV; and east to Durbin, WV. Some of the routes were constructed through subsidiary companies, the Piedmont and Cumberland Railway and the Coal and Iron Railway.

The WVC&P and subsidiaries were sold to the Fuller Syndicate, led by George Gould, in 1902 and merged into the Western Maryland Railway (WM) in 1905. The newly built WM connected to the WVC&P in Ridgeley, WV. The WM was taken over by the Chessie System in 1973, and the Chessie System in turn was merged out of existence and into CSX Transportation in 1980.

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Frontside: West Virginia & Pittsburg Railway Backside: West Virginia & Pittsburg Railway B&O R.R. Flag    CSX R.R. Flag

West Virginia & Pittsburg Railway

Item: 38-W     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s.
Nice block lettering and dark patina.

History

West Virginia and Pittsburgh Railroad. 1876-1990. In 1899, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad (B&O) took over the line. In 1990 the WV&P was merged into CSX .

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Frontside: Wheeling Terminal Railway Backside: Wheeling Terminal Railway PRR Flag

Wheeling Terminal Railway

SOLD     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the A&W Co.
Large-bold serif lettering and great patina.
Very large hilt. A rare 100 year old relic.

History

The Wheeling Terminal Railway (WT) is a former 9 1/2 mile railroad between Martins Ferry, Ohio and Wheeling, West Virginia.

During its operation, the Wheeling Terminal furnished passenger terminal facilities in Wheeling for the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway Co. It also once had connections for freight transfer business with the tracks of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway Co. (PRR Panhandle), the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co., the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway Co., and the Cleveland & Pittsburgh Railroad Co.

In January 1921, the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) took over operations of the WT.

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Frontside: Winston Salem Southbound Railroad Backside: Winston Salem Southbound Railroad WSS R.R. Flag

Winston Salem Southbound Railroad

Item: 43-W     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s. Interesting "B" stamp.
Attractive serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The Winston-Salem Southbound Railway (WSS) is a 90-mile short-line railroad jointly owned by CSX Transportation and the Norfolk Southern Railway, which provide it with equipment. It connects with NS at the north end in Winston-Salem, CSX at the south end in Wadesboro, and in between with NS at Lexington and Whitney, the subsidiary High Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad at High Rock, and the Aberdeen, Carolina and Western Railway at Norwood. Originally owned jointly by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Norfolk and Western Railway, predecessors to CSX and NS, it was completed in November 1910.

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Frontside: Wilmington & Northern Railroad Backside: Wilmington & Northern Railroad Reading R.R. Flag

Wilmington & Northern Railroad

Item: 46-W     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. 1800s. Fraim forged?
Nice pocket worn serif lettering and gold patina.
A very rare key with a unique style bit.

History

The Wilmington Northern Branch was built in 1868 as the Wilmington & Brandywine Railroad. The Reading Company obtained control of it in 1898 and it became the Wilmington & Northern Branch. The W&N is almost entirely curved as it follows its route along streams and rivers from Reading, PA to Wilmington, DE.

The W&N is known for serving steel mills at Reading, Birdsboro and Coatesville. There were numerous smaller industries along the way, including coal dumps, paper mills, scrap yards and quarries. In the Wilmington area was the DuPont Company. The W&N crossed the PRR five times between Birdsboro and Wilmington, with four interchanges. At Wilmington it interchanged with the B&O.

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Frontside: Western Pacific Railroad Backside: Western Pacific Railroad WP R.R. Flag

Western Pacific Railroad

Item: 48-W     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Great block lettering and patina.

History

The Western Pacific Railroad was a Class I railroad in the United States. It was formed in 1903 as an attempt to break the near-monopoly the Southern Pacific Railroad had on rail service into northern California. WP's Feather River Route directly competed with SP's portion of the Overland Route for rail traffic between Salt Lake City/Ogden, Utah and Oakland, California for nearly 80 years. The Western Pacific was one of the original operators of the California Zephyr.

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Frontside: Western Pacific Railroad Backside: Western Pacific Railroad Western Pacific train

Western Pacific Railroad

Item: 49-W     New Listing     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Great stamp marks and patina.

History - continued from above

The Western Pacific was acquired in 1983 by Union Pacific Corporation, which in 1996 would purchase its long-time rival, the Southern Pacific Railroad. In July 2005 Union Pacific unveiled a brand new EMD SD70ACe locomotive, Union Pacific 1983, painted as an homage to the Western Pacific.

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Frontside: Williams Valley Railroad Backside: Williams Valley Railroad Reading R.R. Flag

Williams Valley Railroad

Item: 51-W     Price: $245.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s. Nice tapered ring barrel.
Superb block lettering and patina.
Lucky serial #7

History

The Williams Valley Railroad was an anthracite-hauling railroad that operated in Schuylkill and Dauphin Counties, Pennsylvania from 1892 to 1971. For most of that time, it was a subsidiary of the Reading Railroad. It extended the Reading's Brookside Branch at Brookside 11 miles (18 km) down the Williams Valley to Lykens.

The railroad was originally chartered on September 19, 1891, to connect Brookside (the site of a large colliery served by the Reading) with Lykens. The line was opened on July 1, 1892, from Lykens to a point on the Reading known as Williams Valley Junction. The railroad owned one engine, a Baldwin 2-6-0 named "A.F. Baker." The railroad owned three passenger cars in 1894; these were presumably used to operate "miner's trains" for the colliery workers, as was done on the connecting Reading lines.

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Frontside: Woodstock Railroad & Sycamore Traction Co. Backside: Woodstock Railroad & Sycamore Traction Co. Woodstock R.R. & Sycamore Traction Co.

Woodstock Railroad & Sycamore (Traction Co.)

Item: 52-W     Price: $95.00

Remarks: Operated 1911-18. Forged by the F/S Hdw Co.
This line owns the bragging rights for being one of the
least successful interurban railroads ever built.

History

The Woodstock Railroad and Sycamore Traction Company was a short-lived interurban railroad that operated from 1911 to 1918 between the cities of Sycamore and Marengo, Illinois; it never reached its intended destination of Woodstock. Its headquarters and repair shop were in the city of Genoa, midway on the route. The 26.5-mile track was never electrified, due to lack of funds, McKeen built gasoline-powered cars were used.

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Y



Frontside: Youngstown & Northern Railroad Backside: Youngstown & Northern Railroad How the West was Won

Youngstown & Northern Railroad

Item: 1-Y     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Adlake forged?
Fine pocket wear and superb dark patina.

History

Railroad's played a important part with the steel mills during the "Industrial Age," hauling the coal and ore to the mills and the finished product to market. The Youngstown & Northern Railroad, a shortline, was most likely owned by one of Ohio's steel mills. There is no information out there on the Y&N's demise. With the decline of the steel industry in the 1970's, it was either abandoned or merged into the Genesee & Wyoming.

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Frontside: Youngstown & & Southern Railroad Backside: Youngstown & & Southern Railroad Y&S No.7

Youngstown & & Southern Railway

Item: 2-Y     New Listing     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Adlake forged?
Nice deep stamp marks and dark patina.

History

This road started as a steam road and ended as a diesel freight road. The Y&S built from Youngstown to Columbiana (16 miles) in 1904. In 1907 it built another 3 miles to Leetonia where it connected with the Youngstown & Ohio River. At this time it was electrified. From the very beginning, the Y&S was in the freight business, and interchanged with the Y&OR and the Pittsburgh Lisbon & Western (a steam road). In 1916, after reorganization, the Y&S was the Youngstown & Suburban. In 1928, the Y&S came under the control of the Montour RR who wanted to use the line for an entry into Youngstown. In 1944 the name was changed back to Youngstown & Southern, and the next year the Y&S took over the PL&W, which was also controlled by the Montour.

Passenger service lasted until 1948, the last Ohio interurban. The Leetonia extension was abandoned later that year, and the line was dieselized before long. Later it became part of the Montour, which was the plan in 1928.

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Dates quoted for keys are approximate dates. Railroad switch keys initials (reporting mark) are assumed to be correct and accurate.
Comments on any railroad initials origin, including (typos), are welcome. Last update 05/16/2021

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