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Frontside: Eastern Railroad Backside: Eastern Railroad B&M R.R. Flag        Eastern R.R. depot

Eastern Railroad

Item: 3-E     New Listing     Price: $225.00

Remarks: Absorbed by the B&M in 1890.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
129 years young!

History

The Eastern Railroad was a railroad connecting Boston, Massachusetts to Portland, Maine. Throughout its history, it competed with the Boston & Maine Railroad for service between the two cities, until the Boston & Maine put an end to the competition by leasing the Eastern in December 1884. Much of the railroad's main line in Massachusetts is used by the MBTA's Newburyport/Rockport commuter rail line, and some unused parts of its right-of-way have been converted to rail trails.

The Eastern Railroad Company of Massachusetts was first chartered on April 14, 1836. The line followed the coastline, in contrast to the Boston & Maine's inland route through Massachusetts, and it served North Shore cities such as Lynn, Salem, Beverly, and Newburyport. In keeping with its coastal route, the Eastern Railroad chose to place its Boston terminus in East Boston, a short ferry ride from downtown Boston, rather than building tracks around Chelsea Creek, the Boston Inner Harbor, and the Mystic River into the city.

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Frontside: East Carolina Railway Backside: East Carolina Railway EC car No. 600

East Carolina Railway

Item: 5-E     New Listing     Price: $275.00

Remarks: Absorbed by the ACL in 1935.
Superb serif lettering and copper patina.
A nice 1!

History

The East Carolina Railway was a short-line railroad that ran from 1898 to 1965. Originating in Tarboro, North Carolina the East Carolina Railway interchanged at Farmville, North Carolina with the original Norfolk Southern Railway.

The railroad was acquired by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad (ACL) in 1935, but continued to be locally managed by Henry Clark Bridgers until his death in 1951. The railway continued to be operated under the East Carolina Railway name until the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad abandoned the line in 1965. The last train ran on November 16, 1965.

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Frontside: East Erie Commercial Railroad Backside: East Erie Commercial Railroad GE gas-electric yard switcher

East Erie Commercial Railroad

Item: 6-E     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Erie short line.
Deep stamp marks and superb gold patina.

History

The East Erie Commercial Railroad (EEC) is a small switching railroad that services the GE Locomotive Plant facilities in Erie, Pa. The main line mileage aggregates 6.726 miles. The carrier also owns and uses 3.632 miles of yard tracks and sidings, making a total of 10.358 miles of all tracks. The carrier grants trackage rights to the General Electric Company over a portion of its railroad.

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Frontside: Elgin-Joliet & Eastern Railroad Backside: Elgin-Joliet & Eastern Railroad EJ&E R.R. Flag

Elgin-Joliet & Eastern Railroad

Item: 8-E     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina. This "J" key
stamped "RR" + key below stamped "RY" = nice set.
Given the moniker, "Easy Jobs for Everyone."

History

Most railroads like it or not, had a "moniker" bestowed or labled on them. The "J" and "The Chicago Outer Belt Line" were the nicknames given to the EJ&E railroad. The (Class 2) railroad served as a link between Class I railroads traveling to and from Chicago, although it operated almost entirely within the city's suburbs and only entered Chicago where it served the U.S. Steel South Works on the shores of Lake Michigan.

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Frontside: Elgin-Joliet & Eastern Railway Backside: Elgin-Joliet & Eastern Railway EJ&E #673

Elgin-Joliet & Eastern Railway

Item: 9-E     Price: $60.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and carmel patina.
Gobbled up by the CN. This "J" key stamped
"RY" + key above stamped "RR" = nice set.

History - continued from above

On September 26, 2007, the Canadian National Railway announced it plans to purchase a majority of the EJ&E, leaving a portion of the line in Indiana to be reorganized as the Gary Railway. The purchase was approved on December 24, 2008 by the U.S. Surface Transportation Board, and the deal was consummated effective February 1, 2009. In the years immediately following the merger, the railroad existed as a subsidiary of Canadian National, and EJ&E locomotives that were repainted into CN colors were sub-lettered for the EJ&E.

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Frontside: Elgin & State Line Railway Backside: Elgin & State Line Railway C&NW R.R. Flag

Elgin & State Line Railway

Item: 11-E     Price: $175.00

Remarks: Absorbed into the C&NW System in 1883.
Superb block lettering and patina. Unique style bit.
Another rare 1!

History

A subsidiary of the Chicago & North Western, the Elgin & State Line Railway was a local line that serviced the Lake Geneva, Wisconsin area and, what is known today as, the "Fox River Valley" area. A popular tourist get away, Chicagoan's would hop a train and be at the resort in no time. Lake Geneva was thriving when in 1883, the North Western finally absorbed the Elgin & State Line Railway. To avoid condusion in the delivery of mail with Geneva, Illinois, a city along the same rail line, the community that same year formally changed its name to Lake Geneva. Five years later, this railroad would extend its tracks north and west of Lake Geneva to Williams Bay.

By the turn of the century, thousands of travelers congregated in Lake Geneva's hotels and restaurants each summer. Most visitors arrived and departed on North Western passenger trains operating directly between Lake Geneva and Chicago. All trains bound for the Windy City used the former Elgin & State Line Route as far as Cystal Lake, Illinois.

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Frontside: Erie Railroad Backside: Erie Railroad Erie Alco RS-3    Erie R.R. Flag    2-8-4 type locomotive

Erie Railroad

Item: 14-E     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Nice block lettering and superb patina.
Given the moniker, "Weary Erie."

History

The Erie Railroad, chartered in 1832, was a railroad that operated in the northeastern United States, originally connecting New York City with Lake Erie. It expanded west to Chicago with its 1941 merger with the former Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, also known as the New York Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad. Its mainline route proved influential in the development and economic growth of the Southern Tier, including cities such as Binghamton, Elmira and Hornell. The business recession that occurred in the 1950's led the Erie to explore the idea of doing business with the nearby Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad. Problems still persisted after the 1960 merger and in 1976, the Erie (Erie Lackawanna) became part of Conrail. Today most of the former Erie Railroad routes are operated by Norfolk Southern Railway.

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Frontside: Erie Railroad Backside: Erie Railroad Erie R.R. Flag

Erie Railroad

Item: 15-E     Price: $40.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Fine pocket wear and superb gold patina.
Nicely stamped "E" diamond.

History - continued from above

The Erie held its own against the Great Depression until January 18, 1938 when it entered bankruptcy. Its reorganization, accomplished in December 1941, included purchase of the leased C&MV, swapping high rent for lower interest payments, and purchase of subsidiaries and leased lines. To the surprise of many, Erie began paying dividends.

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Frontside: Erie Railroad Backside: Erie Railroad 1975 movie - Breakheart Pass    1975 movie - Breakheart Pass    1975 movie - Breakheart Pass

Erie Railroad

Item: 16-E     Price: $40.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Great block lettering and gold patina.

History - continued from above

The Erie prospered throughout the mid-1950s, but then began an irreversible decline. The company's 1957 income was half of that in 1956; by 1958 and 1959, the Erie posted deficits. The business recession that occurred in the 1950s led the Erie to explore the idea of doing business with the nearby Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad (DL&W). The first result of this was the abandonment of duplicate freight facilities in Binghamton and Elmira, New York. Between 1956 and 1957, the Erie shifted its passenger trains from its former Jersey City terminal to the DL&W's newer one in Hoboken. Also, the DL&W's main line between Binghamton and Elmira was abandoned in favor of the Erie's parallel main line in 1958. These successful business consolidations led to merger talks (which, at first, also included the Delaware & Hudson Railroad); on October 17, 1960, the two railroads merged to create the Erie Lackawanna Railroad.

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Frontside: Erie Railroad Backside: Erie Railroad 1975 movie - Breakheart Pass

Erie Railroad

Item: 17-E     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Nice block lettering and carmel patina.
Civil War Railroad.

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Frontside: Erie Railroad Backside: Erie Railroad Erie advertisement    Erie passenger train

Erie Railroad

Item: 18-E     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Superb block lettering and patina. Large round hilt.
Different style cut then Erie keys above.
Good possibility MofW key.

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Frontside: Erie Railroad Backside: Erie Railroad Alco PA-1    Erie Railroad

Erie Railroad

Item: 19-E     CT = cripple (rip) track     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged?
Superb serif lettering and patina. Key style listed in
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."

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Frontside: Erie Lackawanna Railroad Backside: Erie Lackawanna Railroad EL R.R. Flag

Erie Lackawanna Railroad

Item: 22-E     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.
Given the moniker, "Erie Lack-o-Money."

History

In 1960, due to poor economic conditions of the times, the Erie Railroad and the Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad merged to form the Erie Lackawanna Railroad. The official motto of the line was "The Friendly Service Route". The northeast railroads,including EL, were in decline due to subsidized highway and waterway competition, high rates of urban property taxation, commuter operations and market saturation (i.e., too many railroad lines competing for what market was remaining). EL struggled for most of the 16 years it existed. The two railroads from which it was formed were losing passengers and freight traffic, and were burdened by years of accumulated debt, confiscatory property taxes, and extensive, money-losing commuter operations. Conrail assumed EL operations on April 1, 1976.

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Frontside: Erie Lackawanna Railroad Backside: Erie Lackawanna Railroad the

Erie Lackawanna Railroad

Item: 23-E     New Listing     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.

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Frontside: Peru National Railway Company Backside: Peru National Railway Company Peru Railway

Peru National Railway Company

Item: 25-E     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
How this key made it to the USA is anyone's guess.
A rarity!

History

In Peru, the company in charge of the railway system is the 'Empresa Nacional de Ferrocarriles' (ENAFER) or the National Railway Company.

Created by decree on September 19, 1972, it was formed by the nationalization of several foreign-owned companies which had serviced mostly two separate networks: the central railroad serving Lima, and the southern railroad offering a second connection to the Pacific Ocean. It has once again been privatised.

The rail network of Peru includes in total 1886 km of lines, mainly with single track that is standard gauge. On this track is found the highest-altitude railway station in the world, Galera, at 4,781 m (15,686 ft) above sea level. The new "Qingzang Railway" now beats this altitude record.

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Frontside: Elmira State Line Railroad Backside: Elmira State Line Railroad Manual turntable    Manual engine turntable

Elmira State Line Railroad

Item: 27-E     New Listing     Price: $165.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Elongated barrel.
Superb large serif lettering and patina.

History

The Elmira State Line Railroad was incorporated April 24, 1872, under the general laws of New York for a period of 100 years, to construct and operate a railroad from Elmira, N. Y., to a point near Lawrenceville, Pa. The date of its organization was June 19, 1872.

The property of the Elmira State Line Railroad was operated by the Tioga Railroad Company from about the date it was completed, September 1, 1876, to some time in 1885. From that date to December 1, 1895, the property was operated by The New York, Lake Erie and Western Railroad Company and its receivers, and from the latter date to December 31, 1917, the property was operated by the Erie. The common-carrier property of this company was taken over for operation by the United States Railroad Administration on January 1, 1918, as part of the system of the Erie, and it is so operated on date of valuation.

The system was abandoned sectionally during the 1930s.

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Frontside: East St. Louis & Suburban Railway Backside: East St. Louis & Suburban Railway Fallen Flag

East St. Louis & Suburban Railway

Item: 28-E     New Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Handland-Buck forged.
Handsome tapered barrel.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina.

History

The East St. Louis & Suburban Railway was an interurban railroad that operated in Illinois. The system expanded during the industrial growth of St. Louis in the late 19th century, spilling across the Mississippi River to the cheaper land on the Illinois side. From 1870-1910, East St. Louis and the surrounding area attracted industrial development to the transportation hub. During this period, the population of East St. Louis nearly doubled each decade. Amidst this growth, the East St. Louis & Suburban grew by acquiring shorter interurban lines. The system was abandoned sectionally during the 1930s.

The system was abandoned sectionally during the 1930s.

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F



Frontside: Fitchburg Railroad Backside:  Fitchburg Railroad Fitchburg R.R. depot

Fitchburg Railroad

Item: 3-F     New Listing     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Bohannan forged.
Superb serif lettering patina.

History

The Fitchburg Railroad is a former railroad company, which built a railroad line across northern Massachusetts, United States, leading to and through the Hoosac Tunnel. The Fitchburg was leased to the Boston and Maine Railroad in 1900. The main line from Boston to Fitchburg is now operated as the MBTA Fitchburg Line; Pan Am Railways runs freight service on some other portions.

The Boston and Maine Railroad leased the Fitchburg for 99 years from July 1, 1900 as its Fitchburg Division. The two companies merged to form a new B&M December 1, 1919. The MBTA bought the line from Boston to Fitchburg, along with many other lines, from the B&M on December 27, 1976. Guilford Transportation took over the former B&M in June 1983.

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Frontside: Franklin & Carolina Railroad Backside: Franklin & Carolina Railroad Franklin & Carolina R.R.    Franklin & Carolina R.R.

Franklin & Carolina Railroad

Item: 5-F     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Elongated barrel.
Excellent serif lettering and copper like patina.
North Carolina logging line sold to the ACL in 1958.
Only Franklin & Carolina key I have seen.

History

On May 2, 1944, The Franklin and Carolina Railroad was incorporated. It was wholly owned by Camp Manufacturing Company but was chartered by the Interstate Commerce Commission as a common carrier. The main purpose of the line was to connect Camp's Franklin paper mill and sawmill with the Atlantic Coast Line, in what was then Nansemond County.

Outgoing traffic was paper, lumber, tall oil (a byproduct of paper making used in the manufacturing of cosmetics) and wood pulp. In addition the incoming and outgoing traffic, a great deal of mill switching was done at Franklin, where connections were made with the Atlantic & Danville and Seaboard were made.

Motive power consisted of two steam engines, #30 a Baldwin 2-6-2, and No.23, a Baldwin 4-6-0, and two Whitcomb 60 ton diesel-electric switchers, 100 and 110, purchased from the U. S. Army.

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Frontside: Florida East Coast Railroad Backside: Florida East Coast Railroad FEC R.R. Flag

Florida East Coast Railroad

Item: 7-F     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. mid-1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering patina.
Given the moniker, "For Elderly Citizens."

History

The Florida East Coast Railway (FEC) is a Class II railroad operating in the U.S. state of Florida and since 2007 has been a subsidiary of Railroad Acquisition Holdings, LLC, itself a subsidiary of Fortress Investment Group, LLC. The FEC was historically a Class I railroad owned by Florida East Coast Industries (FECI) from 2000-2006, FOXX Holdings from 1983-2000, and the St. Joseph Paper Company prior to 1983.

The FEC is possibly best known for building the railroad to Key West, completed in 1912. When the FEC's line from the mainland to Key West was heavily damaged by the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, the State of Florida purchased the remaining right-of-way and bridges south of Dade County, and they were rebuilt into road bridges for vehicle traffic and became known as the Overseas Highway. However, a greater and lasting Flagler legacy was the developments along Florida's eastern coast.

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Frontside: Florida East Coast Railroad Backside: Florida East Coast Railroad Cheyenne TV series

Florida East Coast Railroad

Item: 8-F     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid-1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and carmel patina.

History - continued from above

During the Great Depression, control was purchased by heirs of the du Pont family. After 30 years of fragile financial condition, the FEC, under leadership of a new president, Ed Ball, took on the labor unions. Ball claimed the company could not afford the same costs as larger Class 1 railroads and needed to invest saved funds in its infrastructure, fast becoming a safety issue. Using replacement workers, the company and some of its employees engaged in one of the longest and more violent labor conflicts of the 20th century from 1963 until 1977. Ultimately, federal authorities had to intervene to stop the violence, which included bombings, shootings and vandalism. However, the courts ruled in the FEC's favor with regards to the right to employ strikebreakers. During this time, Ball invested heavily in numerous steps to improve its physical plant, installed various forms of automation,was the first US Railroad to operate two man train crews, eliminate cabooses and end all of its passenger services (which were unprofitable) by 1968.

In modern times, the company's primary rail revenues come from its intermodal and rock trains. Since 2007, it has been owned by Fortress Investment Group, which acquired it for over US$3 billion (including non-rail assets). Fortress previously owned conglomerate short line railroad operator RailAmerica, which for a time operated FEC but the two companies never merged; Fortress no longer owns RailAmerica and RailAmerica no longer operates FEC. A former CSX official, James Hertwig, was named as President and Chief Executive Officer of the company effective July 1, 2010.

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Frontside: Florida Southern Railroad Backside: Florida Southern Railroad Florida Southern locomotive No.8

Florida Southern Railroad

Item: 10-F     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1800's. Born as a narrow gauge line.
Attractive block lettering and superb patina.
Most of the Florida Southern has been abandoned.

History

The Florida Southern (FS) started its history by the name of the Gainesville-Ocala & Charlotte Harbor Railroad on March 4, 1879 with a route from Lake City to Charlotte Harbor with a branch to Palatka. Construction began in January of 1881 at Palatka, as the branch line to this deep water port city was deemed the most important, as most of the construction materials would come by sea.

The Florida Southern was finished at 299 miles of track, making it the largest narrow gauge system in Florida. It also acquired 2.7 million acres of land grants from the Florida's Internal Improvement Fund, making it the largest land grant in Florida. Around 1890 the road was leased to the Jacksonville Tampa & Key West and operated as part of the Tropical Trunk Line.

A severe freeze in 1895 destroyed the Citrus industry in North & Central Florida which in turn forced the stockholders and bondholder to pass control of the Florida Southern to the Plant System on January 1st, 1896. Henry Plant standard gauged the railroad on July 11, 1896 and coordinated operations with the rest of the Plant System.

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Frontside: Fairport-Painesville & Eastern Railroad Backside: Fairport-Painesville & Eastern Railroad N&W R.R. Flag    FP&E R.R. engine No.105

Fairport-Painesville & Eastern Railroad

Item: 12-F     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Very early FP&E key.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History

The carrier was incorporated July 16, 1910, under the general laws of the State of Ohio for the stated purpose of constructing, or otherwise acquiring, and operating a railroad from Fairport to Austinburg, Ohio. The railroad was built in conjunction with and primarily to serve the Diamond Alkali's newly-constructed Painesville plant, the companies were independent of each other.

In November and December 1965 the N&W and a majority of FP&E's shareholders negotiated a deal that would allow the Norfolk & Western Railroad to purchase the FP&E. The FP&E would not be merged into the N&W, but would become a wholly-owned subsidiary of that railroad.

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Frontside: Frisco Railroad Backside: Frisco Railroad Frisco R.R. Flag

Frisco Railroad

Item: 14-F     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Attractive crisp lettering.

History

The St. Louis & San Francisco Railway, also known as the Frisco, was a railroad that operated in the Midwest and South Central U.S. from 1876 to April 17, 1980. Incorporated in Missouri on September 7, 1876. It was formed from the Missouri Division and Central Division of the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. The Atchison-Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, interested in the A & P right of way across the Mojave Desert to California, took the road over until the larger road went bankrupt in 1893; the receivers retained the western right of way but divested the ATSF of the St. Louis-San Francisco mileage on the great plains. The St. Louis-San Francisco Railway had two main lines: St. Louis-Tulsa-Oklahoma City and Kansas City-Memphis-Birmingham. The junction of the two lines was in Springfield, Missouri, home to the company's main shop facility and headquarters.

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Frontside: Frisco Railroad Backside: Frisco Railroad Twisted rail on the Frisco R.R.

Frisco Railroad

Item: 15-F     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

The city of Frisco,Texas was named after the railroad and uses the former railroad's logo as its own logo. The logo is modeled after a stretched-out raccoon skin (giving rise to Frisco High School's mascot, the Fighting Raccoons). From March, 1917, through January, 1959, Frisco, in a joint venture with the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad, operated the "Texas Special." This luxurious train, a streamliner from 1947, ran from St. Louis to Dallas,Texas, Ft. Worth, Texas and San Antonio, Texas. While the Texas Special was the most famous passenger train Frisco ever operated, it also rostered an entire fleet of (11) named trains. Due to the harsh economic conditions of that era, the Frisco merged into the Burlington Northern Railroad on November 21, 1980.

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Frontside: Frisco Railroad Backside: Frisco Railroad Old Frisco, ca. 1800's    Frisco R.R.

Frisco Railroad

Item: 16-F     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and gold patina.

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Frontside: Frisco Railroad Backside: Frisco Railroad Frisco R.R. bridge

Frisco Railroad

Item: 17-F     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged?
Nice bold lettering and gold patina.

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Frontside: Frisco Railroad Backside: Frisco Railroad Frisco Bridge.

Frisco Railroad

Item: 18-F     New Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Nice pocket worn block lettering and gold patina.
Hard key to find.

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Frontside: Fort Smith & Van Buren Railway Backside: Fort Smith & Van Buren Railway KCS RR Flag

Fort Smith & Van Buren Railway

Item: 21-F     Price: $245.00

Remarks: ca.late 1800's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.
Oklahoma shortline operated by the KCS.
A rarity!

History

A twenty-one-mile rail line between Coal Creek and McCurtain was purchased by the Kansas City Southern and operated by them as the Fort Smith and Van Buren Railway.

The Fort Smith & Western Railway (FS&W) was a short line railway running from Fort Smith, Arkansas to Guthrie, Oklahoma, a distance of 217 mile. It was incorporated in 1899 and reached Guthrie in 1903. When the state capitol of Oklahoma moved from Guthrie to Oklahoma City in 1910 the FS&W gained trackage rights over the M-K-T from the main line at Fallis to Oklahoma City. In the early 30's the FS&W was operating a passenger train daily between Fort Smith and Oklahoma City, 227 miles, which included 12 section drawing room sleeping cars and coaches. It also operated a mixed train between Fallis and Guthrie, Oklahoma, 22 miles. When trackage rights, to Oklahoma City were discontinued in 1939 the FS&W closed down. Parts of it were operated by the Fort Smith & Van Buren, a subsidiary of the KCS until abandoned in 1994.

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Frontside: Fort Wayne-Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad Backside: Fort Wayne-Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad FWC&L R.R. Flag

Fort Wayne-Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad

Item: 24-F     Price: $275.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.

History

The Fort Wayne-Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad started operations in 1881 and stopped service in 1890 for a total period of operations of 9 years. After the Civil War railroads exploded in the US with hundreds of lines starting service all over the country. This was the the age of steam locomotives and rail travel was still a luxury.

This line was originally known as the Fort Wayne-Muncie & Cincinnati Railroad. Eventually it was consolidated with the Lake Erie & Western. It was a north-south route through New Castle and Muncie.

The FWC&L was a one state railroad and built lines from Fort Wayne to Muncie, New Castle and Cincinnati. This route became part of Norfolk & Western Railway (N&W) with the purchase of Nickel Plate. The line was in the N&W merger that became Norfolk Southern (NS) and is a major route of the NS system.

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Frontside: Fort Worth & Denver Railroad Backside: Fort Worth & Denver Railroad FW&D R.R. Flag

Fort Worth & Denver Railroad

Item: 25-F     Price: $60.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by Adlake Co.
Block lettering and great gold patina.
This "fallen flag" lasted over 100 years.

History

The Fort Worth & Denver Railway, nicknamed the Denver Road, was a class I American railroad company that operated in the northern part of Texas from 1881-1982 and had a profound influence on the early settlement and economic development of the region. The mainline of the railroad ran from Fort Worth through Wichita Falls, Childress, Amarillo, and Dalhart, to Texline, where it connected with the rails of parent company Colorado & Southern Railway, both of which became a subsidiaries of the Burlington Route in 1908. In 1899 The FW&DC was acquired by the C&S Railway, successor to the Denver & New Orleans Railroad Company. The C&S itself was bought by the Chicago-Burlington & Quincy Railroad in 1908, but the three companies continued to operate as separate legal entities. The FW&D's former main line through the Texas Panhandle and North Texas is now a heavily, used route of BN's successor, the BNSF Railway, primarily for coal and intermodal trains between Fort Worth and the western US. In 1989, BN abandoned the former Fort Worth & Denver South Plains, trackage between Estelline and Lubbock.

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Frontside: Fort Dodge-Des Moines & Southern Railroad Backside: Fort Dodge-Des Moines & Southern Railroad Fort Dodge-Des Moines & Southern Railway

Fort Dodge-Des Moines & Southern Railroad

Item: 26-F     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Iowa's interurban favorite!
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History

Incorporated on February 16, 1906, the Fort Dodge Des Moines & Southern was a classic, large interurban line that ran electric cars between its namesake cities in Iowa. Its extensive freight operations set it apart from many other interurbans, and the revenue from freight prolonged the life of the line. Never noticed by historians was the fact that the FDDM&S also earned revenue from the sale of electricity to rural farms, industries and homes.

The line was the largest interurban in Iowa and was noted for a number of things, including its "800" bridge across the Des Moines River. It owned several large electric freight locomotives and several passenger cars, as well as an unusually large number of freight cars. Its primary freight cargo was gypsum board, which came from gypsum mines and companies in the Lehigh/Fort Dodge area. It interchanged cars carrying these gypsum products with the Chicago & North Western, the Chicago Great Western and the Minneapolis & St Louis Railroads.

Although it was primarily an electric interurban, it started out a steam railroad and ended up as a dieselized railroad. A segment of the line survives today as the Boone & Scenic Valley, which is a tourist line. A visit to this line is highly recommended, and the visitor can see and ride parts of the re-electrified line (which sometimes uses diesels and sometimes steam locomotives, in addition to its electric cars).

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Dates quoted for keys are approximate dates. Railroad switch keys initials (reporting mark) are assumed to be correct and accurate.
Comments on any railroad initials origin, including (typos), are welcome. Last update 09/09/2019

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