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Front: Galesburg & Great Eastern Railroad Back: Galesburg & Great Eastern Railroad Locomotive support facilities    BR R.R. Flag

Galesburg & Great Eastern Railroad

Item: 3-G     Price: $215.00

Remarks: Chartered in 1911.
Forged by the Eagle Lock Co.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The Galesburg & Great Eastern was a railroad which operated in Knox County, Illinois in the United States. Knox County is located in western Illinois, about 180 miles southwest from Chicago. This interesting railroad ran until the early 1960's, hauling coal from a mine located at Victoria, Illinois to Wataga, Illinois, a distance of ten miles (16 kilometers). Although early plans indicated that the road would extend on to Galesburg (a major railroad center nine miles away), ultimately, the railroad would go there in name only.

In the late 1950s the coal supply from the Little John Mines was exhausted. The Stonefort Corp. which was the last operator finally declared, "no coal-no railroad" and the line was abandoned.

It has often been asked why the Chicago Burlington & Quincy Railroad didn't include the name Galesburg? It is interesting to note that the early plans of the Galesburg & Great Eastern Railroad would be extended to Galesburg, however it would to there in name only.

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Front: Georgia Midland Railroad Back: Georgia Midland Railroad Georgia Midland R.R

Georgia Midland Railroad

Item: 5-G     Price: $75.00

Remarks: Chartered in 2004.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and patina.
Short lived Georgia short line.

History

The Georgia Midland Railroad was a shortline railroad that operated several lines in Georgia that it acquired in 2004 from the initial operations of Ogeechee Railway.

In 2009 the Georgia Midland was purchased by Pioneer RailCorp from Atlantic Western Transportation Company, the holding company for the Heart of Georgia Railroad. Pioneer renamed the railroad as the Georgia Southern Railway. Hauling an average of 5000 carloads per year of aggregate sand, stone, farm products and wood, the Georgia Midland Railroad connected with the Norfolk Southern Railway.

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Front: Georgia Railroad Back: Georgia Railroad Georgia R.R.    Georgia R.R.

Georgia Railroad

Item: 7-G     New Listing     Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and gold patina.

History

The company was chartered in 1833 in Augusta, Georgia. In 1835, the charter was amended to include banking. Originally the line was chartered to build a railroad from Augusta to Athens, with a branch to Madison. It was converted to 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1/2 in) in 1886.

The banking side of the business was quickly more successful than the railroad side. The Georgia Railroad & Banking Company was perhaps the strongest bank in Georgia for many years. The bankers used some of their wealth to buy controlling interests in the Atlanta & West Point Railroad (A&WP) and the Western Railway of Alabama (WofA), which provided a continuous line from Atlanta to Montgomery, Alabama, although the WofA was standard gauge, while all the other lines in the South were broad gauge.

1983 saw the end of the Georgia Railroad as a separate company, after Family Lines purchased the railroad properties of the Georgia Railroad and Banking Company, which had until then been the subject of a lease. In 1986, SCL merged with the Chessie System, to form CSX Transportation. The same year, Georgia Railroad Bank was acquired by First Union.

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Front: Georgia Midland Railroad Back: Georgia Midland Railroad Georgia Midland R.R

Georgia Midland Railroad

Item: 8-G     Price: $75.00

Remarks: Chartered in 2004.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and patina.
Short lived Georgia short line.

History

The Georgia Midland Railroad was a shortline railroad that operated several lines in Georgia that it acquired in 2004 from the initial operations of Ogeechee Railway.

In 2009 the Georgia Midland was purchased by Pioneer RailCorp from Atlantic Western Transportation Company, the holding company for the Heart of Georgia Railroad. Pioneer renamed the railroad as the Georgia Southern Railway. Hauling an average of 5000 carloads per year of aggregate sand, stone, farm products and wood, the Georgia Midland Railroad connected with the Norfolk Southern Railway.

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Front: Georgia Central Railroad Co. Back: Georgia Central Railroad Co. CofG R.R. Flag

Georgia Central Railroad Co.

Item: 12-G     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s-early 1900s.
Bohannan forged.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
Same style bit as CofG key.
Original name before CofG. A gem!

History

The Central of Georgia Railway started as the "Central Rail Road & Canal Company" in 1833. As a way to better attract investment capital, the railroad changed its name to "Central Rail Road & Banking Company of Georgia." This railroad was constructed to join the Macon & Western Railroad at Macon, Georgia, and run to Savannah. This created a rail link from Chattanooga, on the Tennessee River, to seaports on the Atlantic Ocean. It took from 1837 to 1843 to build the railroad from Savannah to the eastern bank of the Ocmulgee River at Macon; a bridge into the city was not built until 1851. During the Savannah Campaign of the American Civil War, conducted during November and December 1864, Federal troops tore up the rails and converted them into "Sherman's neckties."

In 1907 railroad magnate and financier E. H. Harriman gained a controlling interest in the railway, and in 1909 sold his interest to the Illinois Central Railroad, which he also controlled. In 1932, during the Great Depression, the CofG went into receivership, from which it did not emerge until 1948. In 1956, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway (Frisco), seeking a route to Atlantic Ocean ports, gained control of the CofG, but the Interstate Commerce Commission declined to approve a merger of the two roads, so the Frisco sold its CofG stock to the Southern Railway in 1963.

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Back: Great Northern Railway GN R.R. Flag

Great Northern Railway

Item: 15-G     A Division     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Forged by the A&W Co.
Nice deep stamp marks and gold patina.
Given the moniker, "the Billy Goat."

History

The Great Northern Railway was an American Class I railroad. Running from Saint Paul, Minnesota, to Seattle, Washington, it wasthe creation of 19th century railroad tycoon James J. Hill and was developed from the Saint Paul & Pacific Railroad. The GN's route was the northernmost transcontinental railroad route in the U.S. The Great Northern was "the only privately funded and successfully built transcontinental railroad in U.S. history". No federal land grants were used during its construction, unlike all other transcontinental railroads.

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Front: Great Northern Railway Back: Great Northern Railway 1954 Western Rails Into Laramie

Great Northern Railway

Item: 16-G     A Division     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

The Great Northern was built in stages, slowly to create profitable lines, before extending the road further into the undeveloped Western territories. In a series of the earliest public relations campaigns, contests were held to promote interest in the railroad and the ranchlands along its route. Fred J. Adams used promotional incentives such as feed and seed donations to farmers getting started along the line. Contests were all-inclusive, from largest farm animals to largest freight carload capacity and were promoted heavily to immigrants and newcomers from the East.

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Front: Great Northern Railway Back: Great Northern Railway GN steam locomotive William Crooks

Great Northern Railway

Item: 17-G     New     A Division     Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Nice Fraim/Slaymaker forged key.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History - continued from above

The very first predecessor railroad to the company was the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad owned by William Crooks. He had gone bankrupt running a small line between St. Paul and Minneapolis. He named the locomotive (see photo above) he ran for himself and the "William Crooks" would be the first locomotive of the Great Northern Railway.

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Front: Great Northern Railway Back: Great Northern Railway 1954 Western Rails Into Laramie    Poster advertisement    1954 Western Rails Into Laramie

Great Northern Railway

Item: 18-G     C Division     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina.

In 1910 the Great Northern fell victim to the deadliest avalanche in U.S. history at the site of the defunct town of Wellington, Washington. In 1881 James J Hill took over the 1856 charter of the Minneapolis & St. Cloud Railroad. He first used its franchises to build the Eastern Railway of Minnesota from Hinckley, Minnesota to Superior, Wisconsin, and Duluth. Its charter was liberal enough that he chose it as the vehicle for his line to the Pacific. Hill renamed the railroad the "Great Northern Railway."

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Front: Great Northern Railway Back: Great Northern Railway 1954 Western - Rails Into Laramie    1954 Western - Rails Into Laramie    1954 Western - Rails Into Laramie

Great Northern Railway

Item: 19-G     C Division     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.

History - continued from above

The Great Northern energetically promoted settlement along its lines in North Dakota and Montana, especially by Germans and Scandinavians from Europe. The Great Northern bought its lands from the federal government; it received no land grants and resold them to farmers one by one. It operated agencies in Germany and Scandinavia that promoted its lands and brought families over at low cost, building special colonist cars to transport immigrant families. The rapidly increasing settlement in North Dakota's Red River Valley along the Minnesota border between 1871 and 1890 was a major example of large-scale "bonanza" farming.

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Front: Great Northern Railroad Back: Great Northern Railroad 1954 Western Rails Into Laramie    1954 Western Rails Into Laramie

Great Northern Railway

Item: 20-G     i Division     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Pocket worn lettering and copper patina.

History - continued from above

The logo of the railroad, a Rocky Mountain goat, was based on a goat William Kenney, one of the railroad's presidents, had used to haul newspapers as a boy.

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Front: Great Northern Railroad Back: Great Northern Railroad GN Ry station, Fargo    GN R.R. Flag    GN Ry's Seattle docks

Great Northern Railway

Item: 21-G     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Fraim/Slaymaker forged.
Pocket worn block lettering
and nice gold patina.

History - continued from above

GN operated various passenger trains, but the Empire Builder was their premier passenger train. It was named in honor of James J. Hill, known as the "Empire Builder." Amtrak still operates the Empire Builder today, running it over the old Great Northern's Northern Transcon north of St. Paul.

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Front: Great Northern Railway Back: Great Northern Railway GN Ry snowshed    GN Ry passenger train

Great Northern Railway

Item: 22-G     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Tall steel key.
Steam era oiler's key.

History - continued from above

On March 2, 1970, the Great Northern, together with the Northern Pacific Railway, the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad and the Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway merged to form the Burlington Northern Railroad. The BN operated until 1996, when it merged with the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway to form the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway.

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Front: Georgetown Railway Back: Georgetown Railway Georgetown R.R. Flag

Georgetown Railway

Item: 24-G     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s.
Forged by Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.

History

The original Georgetown Railroad Company was chartered on May 31, 1878, with a commitment to build a railroad the approximately 10 mile distance between Georgetown and Round Rock. The headquarters was in Georgetown. The International-Great Northern Railroad stepped in and purchased the Georgetown Railroad and merged it into their system. The proceeds of the first stock offering was about $50,000, and the end of 1878, the GRR had connected Georgetown to Round Rock. Soon, the railroad found itself in difficult financial straits and George M. Dilly, acting for the receiver of the International & Great Northern Railroad, (I&GN) purchased the Georgetown. Operations merged with that company in 1882.

The branch was operated by the I&GN and its successors until 1959, when it was sold to the new Georgetown Railroad Company.

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Front: Georgia & Florida Railroad Back: Georgia & Florida Railroad G&W R.R. Flag

Georgia & Florida Railroad

Item: 26-G     Price: $95.00

Remarks:Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Not a very attractive key but
a hard one to find key.
Given the moniker, "God Forsaken."

History

The Georgia & Florida Railroad was a railroad in the Southern U.S., with a main line from Madison, Florida to Greenwood, South Carolina. The Southern Railway gained control in 1963, reorganized it as the Georgia & Florida Railway, and merged it into subsidiary Central of Georgia Railroad in 1971.

Most of the G&F was assembled by John Skelton Williams, former president of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, between 1906 and 1911.

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Front: Genesee & Wyoming Railroad Back: Genesee & Wyoming Railroad G&W R.R. Flag

Genesee & Wyoming Railway

Item: 28-G     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.

History

Genesee & Wyoming Inc. is a short-line railroad holding company that owns or maintains interests in 120 railroads throughout five countries (the United States, Canada, Australia, Belgium, and the Netherlands), and operates more than 15,500 miles (24,900 km) of owned and leased track, with more than 3,300 miles (5,300 km) under additional track-access arrangements. The company had its roots in the Class III Genesee and Wyoming Railroad, which began in 1899.

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Front: Genesee & Wyoming Railroad Back: Genesee & Wyoming Railroad Huron Central train

Genesee & Wyoming Railway

Item: 29-G     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.
Given the moniker, "Guilford Fail System."

History - continued from above

Genesee & Wyoming Railroad, predecessor of Genesee & Wyoming Inc., was purchased out of bankruptcy in 1899 by Edward L. Fuller. At that time, the railroad was operating as a 14.5 miles (23.3 km) long single-track line serving a single customer, a salt mine owned by Fuller in Retsof, NY. It was still operating the same line for the salt mine when Mortimer B. Fuller III, great grandson of Edward L. Fuller, purchased the railroad in 1977. The holding company, Genesee & Wyoming Railroad Inc., was organized during the same year, and the railroad became its subsidiary.

With deregulation of the rail industry by the Staggers Rail Act of 1980, railroads began disposing of unprofitable routes. Genesee & Wyoming acquired several of these short line railroads, scattered across the United States, from 1985 to 1996. Its acquisitions began including railroads in other countries in 1997

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Front: Georgia Power Company Back: Georgia Power Company Atlanta 1915

Georgia Power Company

Item: 31-G     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Slaymaker forged.
Attractive serif lettering and two-tone patina.

History

Georgia Power is an electric utility headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. It was established as the Georgia Railway and Power Company and began operations in 1902 running streetcars in Atlanta as a successor to the Atlanta Consolidated Street Railway Company.

Originally the Georgia Railway and Power Company, it began in 1902 as a company running the streetcars in Atlanta, and was the successor to the Atlanta Consolidated Street Railway Company. In the 1930s, the company published a free newsletter called Two Bells which was distributed on its streetcars; Two Bells was still distributed into the 1960s on the buses of successor Atlanta Transit Company (ATC). From 1937 until 1950, Georgia Power also operated trolleybuses in Atlanta, and in 1950 its network of 31 electric bus routes was the largest trolley bus system in the United States. After the Atlanta transit strike of 1950, the Atlanta Transit Company took over operations. Atlanta Streetcar was formed in the 2000s to establish a new streetcar service along Peachtree Street.

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Front: Green Bay & Western Railroad Back: Green Bay & Western Railroad GB&W R.R. Flag

Green Bay & Western Railroad

Item: 33-G     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Adlake forged.
GB&W keys not rare, but difficult to find.

History

The Green Bay & Western Railroad served central Wisconsin for almost 100 years before it was absorbed into the Wisconsin Central in 1993. For much of its history the railroad was also known as the Green Bay Route. At the end of 1970 it operated 255 miles of road on 322 miles of track; that year it reported 317 million ton-miles of revenue freight. The GB&W railroad was formed in 1896 from the bankruptcy proceedings of the Green Bay-Winona & St Paul and the Kewaunee-Green Bay & Western. The existing route, originally built by the Green Bay & Lake Pepin Railroad, linking Green Bay, Wisconsin, and East Winona, Wisconsin, formed the bulk of the new railroad. The Itel Corporation purchased the Green Bay & Western in 1978. The Green Bay & Western and the Fox River Valley Railroad were merged into a new Wisconsin Central subsidiary, the Fox Valley & Western Railroad August 27, 1993. Wisconsin Central was, in turn, purchased by Canadian National Railway in 2001.

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Front: Grand Trunk Railway Back: Grand Trunk Railway GT R.R. Flag

Grand Trunk Railway

Item: 36-G     New Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800s.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
In 1900, GT merged lines formed the GTW.

History

The Grand Trunk Railway was a railway system that operated in the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario and in the American states of Connecticut, Maine, Michigan, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.

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Front: Grand Trunk Western Railroad Back: Grand Trunk Western Railroad GT locomotive

Grand Trunk Western Railroad

Item: 37-G     New Listing     Price: $25.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice box lettering and gold patina.

History

The Grand Trunk Western Railroad Company (reporting mark GTW) is an American subsidiary of the Canadian National Railway operating in Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Since a corporate restructuring in 1971, the railroad has been under CN's subsidiary holding company, the Grand Trunk Corporation. Grand Trunk Western's routes are part of CN's Michigan Division.

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Front: Grand Trunk Western Railroad Back: Grand Trunk Western Railroad GTW R.R. Flag

Grand Trunk Western Railroad

Item: 38-G     New Listing     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice box lettering and carmel patina.

History - continued from above

Grand Trunk Western began as a route for the Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) to link its line to Chicago through lower Michigan. GTR's objective was to have a mainline from shipping ports in Portland, Maine, to rail connections in Chicago through the southern part of the Province of Canada that would serve Toronto and Montreal.

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Front: Grand Trunk Western Railroad Back: Grand Trunk Western Railroad GT locomotive

Grand Trunk Western Railroad

Item: 39-G     New Listing     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s.
Forged by the Adlake Co.
Great box lettering and carmel patina.

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Front: Graysonia-Nashville & Ashdown Railroad Back: Graysonia-Nashville & Ashdown Railroad GN&A engine

Graysonia-Nashville & Ashdown Railroad

Item: 40-G     Price: $110.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged?
Superb block lettering and dark gold patina. Key is listed in the
"American Railways Switch Key Directory."

History

The carrier was incorporated October 25, 1922, under the general laws of Arkansas. The articles of incorporation are dated August 29, 1922, which is recorded as the date of organization. The purpose of incorporation was to acquire and operate that part of the railroad formerly owned by the Memphis, Dallas & Gulf Railroad Company, extending from Ashdown to Shawmut, Ark., about 61 miles.

The carrier is an Arkansas corporation, having its principal office at Nashville, Ark. The records reviewed do not indicate that the carrier is controlled by any company, firm, or individual, or that it controls any common-carrier corporation.

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Front: Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Back: Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad GR&I RR Flag

Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway

Item: 43-G     Price: $125.00

Remarks: Operated 1854-1918.
Nice block lettering and gold patina.
The GR&I merged into the Pennsy.
Rare key

History

The Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad at its height provided passenger and freight railroad services between Cincinnati, Ohio and the Straits of Mackinac in Michigan, USA. The company was formed on January 18, 1854. After grappling with financial difficulties for many years, the company opened service between Bridge Street in Grand Rapids, Michigan to Cedar Springs, Michigan on December 25, 1867, a distance of about 20 miles. By 1869 the railroad was again in trouble with its creditors, and the courts appointed a receiver, Jesse L. Williams of Fort Wayne, Indiana, to control the company. Under Williams' direction, the Continental Improvement Company was hired on May 1, 1869 to complete the line between Fort Wayne and Little Traverse Bay in Michigan. Fifty-one days later, on June 21, 1869, the Continental Improvement Company had laid the last rail connecting Cedar Springs to Morley, Michigan. Williams was discharged as receiver on June 20, 1871. By 1907 four passenger trains were running north to and from Mackinaw City daily. Passenger train fares were not enough to support the railroad and ridership declined. In 1909 the railroad reported a profit of 24.4 cents for every passenger for each mile carried; by 1921 the railroad was losing 19.5 cents per passenger mile. In 1918, the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad was bought by the Pennsylvania Railroad now Conrail.

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Front: Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad Back: Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad GR&I RR Flag

Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad

Item: 45-G    

Item: 52-S     New     North Division Key     Listing     Price: $100.00

Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
Given the moniker, "Grease Mud & Oil."

History

The Gulf, Mobile and Ohio was a Class I railroad in the central United States whose primary routes extended from Mobile, Alabama, and New Orleans, Louisiana, to St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri, as well as Chicago, Illinois.

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Front: Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad Back: Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad GM&O train

Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad

Item: 46-G     North Division Key     Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
Given the moniker, "Grease Mud & Oil."

History - continued from above

The Gulf, Mobile and Northern Railroad was created as the reorganization of the New Orleans, Mobile and Chicago Railroad in 1917. The GM&O was incorporated in 1938 to merge the Gulf, Mobile and Northern Railroad and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, which was accomplished in 1940. The GM&O later bought and merged the Alton Railroad in 1947.

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Front: Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad Back: Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad GR&I RR Flag

Gulf-Mobile & Ohio Railroad

Item: 47-G     Price: $75.00

Remarks: Operated 1938-1972
Nice block lettering and patina.

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Front: Gulf & Ship Island Railroad Back: Gulf & Ship Island Railroad Gulf & Ship Island Railroad

Gulf & Ship Island Railroad

Item: 50-G     Price: $165.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Forged by the A&W Co.
Nice block lettering and dark patina.

History

The Gulf & Ship Island Railroad was constructed in the state of Mississippi, USA, at the turn of the 20th century to open a vast expanse of southern yellow pine forests for commercial harvest. In spite of economic uncertainty, entrepreneurs William H. Hardy and Joseph T. Jones successfully completed railroad construction. The railroad resulted in the development of a seaport and expansion of cities along its route.

The state of Mississippi derived substantial benefits from the G&SIRR. The railroad facilitated the development of towns along its route, gave rise to a booming timber industry, resulted in the creation of the city of Gulfport, and brought about construction of a deep-water seaport. Beginning in 1924, the G&SIRR operated as a subsidiary of the "Illinois Central Railroad" but lost its independent identity in 1946

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Front: GG Railway Back: GG Railway GG R.R. Flag

GG Railway

Item: 52-G     coach key     Price: $20.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. A rarity.
Great serif lettering and patina.

History

The original Brooklyn-Queens Crosstown Local service began on August 19, 1933, as a shuttle between Queens Plaza on the IND Queens Boulevard Line and Nassau Avenue. This service was designated GG because the IND used double letters to indicate local service. Starting on April 24, 1937, GG trains were extended to Forest Hills-71st Avenue during rush hours, serving as the Queens Boulevard local while E trains ran express west of Continental Avenue. The entire IND Crosstown Line was completed on July 1, 1937, including the connection to the IND Culver Line. GG service ran at all times between Forest Hills-71st Avenue and Church Avenue. Soon after, it was cut back to Smith-Ninth Streets.

The 1939 World's Fair was served by GG trains, some of which were marked as S Special, via the short lived IND World's Fair Line to Horace Harding Boulevard. Trains were extended to the World's Fair Station at all times during the fair, supplemented by PM hour E trains. The fair closed on October 28, 1940, and GG service was truncated back to Forest Hills-71st Avenue.

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H



Front: Harrisburg Traction Company Back: Harrisburg Traction Company Harrisburg trolley token

Harrisburg Traction Company

Item: 3-H     Price: $145.00

Remarks: Operated 1895-1903.
Bohannan forged.
Nice serif lettering and patina.
Rare - 115+ year old Harrisburg trolley key.

History

The first known public transportation in Harrisburg began in 1865 with a horse drawn trolley that was said to be purchased used from Philadelphia. This first line ran between downtown Harrisburg and McClay St. In 1873 the Harrisburg City Passenger Railway Co. bought the previous company and began service. Over the next few years new track was laid and service expanded. In 1875 the Harrisburg and Middletown Omnibus Co. was organized to feed passengers to the trolley.

July 4, 1888 saw the first test run of an electric trolley in Harrisburg by the East Harrisburg Passenger Railway. On July 17 regular service with electric trolleys began on both the Steelton and Allison Hill lines. Harrisburg City Railway did not begin electrification until the beginning of 1891. However, before work commenced the East Harrisburg Co. made an offer to purchase Harrisburg City and in April of 1891 the two companies merged. Yet another streetcar company was formed in 1892, the Citizens Passenger Railway Co. with service to the Steelton - Oberlin areas and extensions into Harrisburg.

By 1895 it was apparent that the two companies were duplicating service and a merger was proposed. On June 18, 1895 the Harrisburg Traction Company was chartered.

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Front: Hamilton Belt Railway Back: Hamilton Belt Railway B&O R.R. Flag    CSX R.R. Flag

Hamilton Belt Railway

Item: 4-H    Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.
HB of Ohio was Butler County's shortest
railroad, 2.9 miles.

History

The 2.9-mile Hamilton Belt Railway operated entirely within Hamilton from 1898 until 2012, serving several industries on the citys' West Side. Its prime customer for 114 years was Champion Papers (later SMART Papers). By 1926, Champion was dispatching 18 to 20 cars of paper daily, and bringing in an average of 144 box cars and 55 coal cars each week. In 1926, HBR tracks were purchased by the B&O. By 1940, Champion's Hamilton mill rail yards had more than 20 miles of track with several steam locomotives shuttling cars around the clock. HBR began losing business to trucks after World War II. It had no locomotives or cars and was worked in succession by the CH&D, the B&O, CSX and, after 1988, by privately-owned short line companies.

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Front: Harbor Belt Line Railroad Back: Harbor Belt Line Railroad PHL 101

Harbor Belt Line Railroad

Item: 7-H     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Excellent serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The Harbor Belt Line was owned by three railroads and the city of Los Angeles Harbor Department.

The Pacific Harbor Line (reporting mark PHL) was formed in 1998 to take over the Harbor Belt Line (HBL). The PHL was formed to create a level playing field for shippers. Up to that time, the HBL was owned and operated by the major railroads in Los Angeles; the Southern Pacific, the Santa Fe Railway and the Union Pacific. The PHL, in contrast, is privately owned by the Anacostia & Pacific Company. It operates on tracks and facilities owned by the ports.

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Front: Harbor Belt Line Railroad Back: Harbor Belt Line Railroad Houston E & W Texas Ry depot    Houston E & W Texas Ry depot

Harbor Belt Line Railroad

Item: 8-H     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Superb block lettering and carmel patina.
Nice early Belt key.

History - continued from above

PHL was the first railroad to have its locomotive fleet composed only of Tier II and Tier III "clean diesel" locomotives. Pacific Harbor Line was named the 2009 Short Line Railroad of the Year by Railway Age magazine.

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Front: Harbor Belt Line Railroad Back: Harbor Belt Line Railroad PHL 101

Harbor Belt Line Railroad

Item: 9-H     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Excellent serif lettering and gold patina.

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Front: Holyoke & Westfield Railroad Back: Holyoke & Westfield Railroad NYNH&H R.R. Flag

Holyoke & Westfield Railroad

Item: 10-H     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by Romer & Co.
Very nice serif lettering and gold patina.
Absorbed by the NYNH&H Railroad
150 year old beauty!

History

The Holyoke and Westfield Railroad was created by the city in the 1860's to provide a competitor to the CNRR and connected Holyoke with Westfield to the southwest. From there, goods could connect to the New Haven and Boston & Albany railroads.

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Front: Houston Belt & Terminal Railway Co Back: Houston Belt & Terminal Railway Co HB&T R.R. Flag

Houston Belt & Terminal Railway Company

SOLD     New Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History

The Houston Belt and Terminal Railway Company was chartered on August 31, 1905, to provide passenger and freight terminals in Houston for four railroads. Three of the lines, the Trinity and Brazos Valley Railway Company, the Beaumont, Sour Lake and Western Railway Company, and the St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway Company, were part of the system being constructed by Benjamin F. Yoakum. The fourth participant was the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway Company. Each railroad owned a 25 percent interest in the Houston Belt and Terminal.

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Front: High Point-Thomasville & Denton Railroad Back: High Point-Thomasville & Denton Railroad CSX R.R. Flag    WSS R.R. Flag    CSX R.R. Flag

High Point-Thomasville & Denton Railroad

Item: 14-H     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900s. Adlake forged?
Nice block lettering and dark patina.
Not rare, but hardly seen!

History

The High Point, Thomasville, and Denton Railroad (Reporting mark HPTD) was a 20-mile short-line railroad owned by the jointly CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railway owned Winston-Salem Southbound Railway (WSS). The Winston-Salem Southbound Railway, filed a request April 13, 2010, to merge the High Point, Thomasville, and Denton Railroad into the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway.

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Front: Hutchinson & Northern Railroad Back: Hutchinson & Northern Railroad HN R.R. Flag

Hutchinson & Northern Railroad

Item: 16-H     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900s.
Started as a electic trolley line.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.
Stamped "HN" on both sides of key.

History

The company began operating in 1923, when its electrified Carey Saltin wells serving the freight line was introduced. HN currently operates a switching and terminal service from a connection with UP and BNSF at Hutchinson to Salt Mine, KS (5.1 miles). Traffic is mainly salt.

The following information was taken from the "Electric Railway Journal," dated March 7, 1914. The construction began with a 14 mile line, laying track from Hutchinson to Burrton. From Burrton the line will be extended west to Nickerson, Sterling and Great Bend, with Dodge City as the eventual terminus.

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Front: Hocking Valley Railroad Back: Hocking Valley Railroad HV R.R. Flag

Hocking Valley Railroad

Item: 18-H     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Bohannan forged?
Attractive block lettering and gold patina.

History

The Hocking Valley Railway was a railroad in the U.S. state of Ohio, with a main line from Toledo to Athens and Pomeroy via Columbus. The earliest predecessor of the Hocking Valley was the Mineral Railroad, incorporated in April 1864 to build from Athens in the rich Hocking Valley to Columbus.

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Front: Hocking Valley Railroad Back: Hocking Valley Railroad HV train crew

Hocking Valley Railroad

Item: 19-H     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Bohannan forged.
Nice serif lettering and silver patina.
This key + brass HV key below= nice set!

History - continued from above

The HV also had several branches to the coal mines of the Hocking Valley near Athens. The company became part of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway system in 1910 and the line between Toledo and Columbus continues to see trains as CSX Transportation Columbus Subdivision. Portions of the main line south of Columbus are now operated by the Indiana & Ohio Railway and Hocking Valley Scenic Railway. When the C&O acquired control of the Pere Marquette Railway in 1929, the Hocking Valley served as its connection to the rest of the system. Finally, the Hocking Valley was merged into the C&O in April 1930.

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Front: Hocking Valley Railroad Back: Hocking Valley Railroad HV caboose

Hocking Valley Railroad

Item: 20-H     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Forged by F-S Hdw. Co.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina.
This key + steel HV key above = nice set!

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Front: Hudson Valley Railway Back: Hudson Valley Railway Hudson-Valley-Map

Hudson Valley Railway

Item: 22-H     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Bohannan forged.
Nice pocket worn serif lettering
and gold patina. Interurban trolley line.

History

A New York state trolley line that operated in the Hudson Valley in the early 20th century. The line ran from Albany to Warrenburg.

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Front: Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad Back: Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad H&BTM R.R. Flag

Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad

Item: 26-H     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad and Coal Company was chartered on May 6, 1852, and organized on January 10, 1853. The purpose of the line was to provide a rail link from Huntingdon to Bedford, and to provide a competitive alternate route to local coal producers to break the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad's monopoly on coal that was being shipped from the Cumberland, Maryland, area. The existence of high quality semi-bituminous coal in the Broad Top Mountain region was known since colonial times. Before the railroad, wagon or pole barge was the only practical method of bringing the coal from the remote region to market. This coal hauler supplied the coal for the troop trains during the Civil War and World War 1

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Front: Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad Back: Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad H&BTM train    H&BT No.38

Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad

Item: 27-H     Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.

History - continued from above

The railroad was at its height in the last decades of the 19th century and the pre-World War I period of the 20th century. The completion of the Bedford Division allowed the PRR to divert most of the lucrative through traffic from the Cumberland area away from the H&BTM. The decline of the Broad Top Mountain coal fields, the maturity of construction bonds, and many ill-advised right of way improvements and equipment purchases took their financial toll. The Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad declared bankruptcy on October 11, 1953, operated its last passenger train in November 1953, and ceased operations on March 31, 1954.

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Front: Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad Back: Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad H&BTM engine No.38

Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad

Item: 28-H     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900s.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.

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Dates quoted for keys are approximate dates. Railroad switch keys initials (reporting mark) are assumed to be correct and accurate.
Comments on any railroad initials origin, including (typos), are welcome. Last update 07/21/2021

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