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Frontside: Reading Railroad Backside: Reading Reading R.R. Flag

Reading Co. Railroad

Item: 1-R     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged.
Nice block lettering and patina. This key has
different style bit and a wider barrel opening than
Reading keys below.

History

The Reading Company, usually called the Reading Railroad, operated in southeast Pennsylvania and neighboring states. Until the decline in anthracite loadings in the Coal Region after World War II, it was one of the most prosperous corporations in the United States. Reduced coal traffic coupled with highway competition and short hauls forced it into bankruptcy in the 1970s. The railroad was merged into Conrail in 1976, but the corporation lasted into 2000, disposing of real estate holdings.

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Frontside: Reading Railroad Backside: Reading Railroad Reading engine No.1821

Reading Co. Railroad

Item: 2-R     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Elongated barrel. Superb block lettering and patina.
Standard Reading switch key. Key listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."

History - continued from above

Commonly called the Reading Railroad and logotyped as Reading Lines, the Reading Company was a railroad holding company for the majority of its existence and was a (single) railroad during its later years. It was a successor to the Philadelphia and Reading Railway Company founded in 1833. Until the decline in anthracite loadings in the Coal Region after World War II, it was one of the most prosperous corporations in the United States.

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Frontside: Reading Railroad Backside: Reading Railroad Monopoly Chance card     Reading Railroad card

Reading Co. Railroad

Item: 3-R     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Elongated barrel. Superb serif lettering
and carmel patina. A nice 1!

History - continued from above

Competition with the modern trucking industry that used the Interstate highway system for short distance transportation of goods, also known as short hauls, compounded the company's problems, forcing it into bankruptcy in the 1970s.

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Frontside: Reading Railroad Backside: Reading Railroad Reading Camelback

Reading Co. Railroad

Item: 4-R     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged.
Superb block lettering and dark patina.
"G" and "H" series keys listed below.

History - continued from above

The Reading Company did not operate extensive long distance passenger train service, but it did field a number of named trains, most famous of which was the streamlined Crusader, which connected Philadelphia and Jersey City.

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Frontside: Reading Railroad Backside: Reading Railroad Reading R.R. Flag

Reading Co. Railroad

Item: 5-R     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged?
Superb block lettering and gold patina.


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Frontside: Reading Railroad Backside: Reading Railroad Reading Terminal

Reading Co. Railroad

Item: 6-R     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged?
Nice block lettering and patina.
"G" and "F" series keys listed above.

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Frontside: Raleigh & Gaston Railroad Backside: Raleigh & Gaston R&G R.R. Pres.

Raleigh & Gaston Railroad

Item: 8-R     Price: $275.00

Remarks: ca. mid-late 1800's. North Carolina line.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.

History

The Raleigh & Gaston Railroad was a Raleigh, North Carolina-based railroad opened in April 1840 between Raleigh and the town of Gaston, North Carolina, on the Roanoke River. It was North Carolina's second railroad (the Wilmington & Raleigh Railroad opened one month earlier). The length was 100 miles (160 km) and built with 4 ft 8 in (1,422 mm) gauge

The Raleigh & Gaston Railroad merged with the Seaboard Air Line Railroad in 1900, eventually becoming part of CSX Transportation. The Raleigh & Gaston's tracks now make up part of CSX's - S Line; the Norlina Subdivision of CSX's Florence Division.

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Frontside: River Terminal Railroad Backside: River Terminal Railroad River Terminal Railway

River Terminal Railway

Item: 9-R     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's.
Serif lettering and nice carmel patina.

History

The River Terminal Railway Co., a class I "switching" or "Belt line," has been a vital link between Cuyahoga River Valley industries and the main-line railroads into Cleveland. The railway was incorporated in 1909 as a subsidiary of the Corrigan-McKinney Steel Co. to service 2 small blast furnaces on the west side of the Cuyahoga river. When Corrigan-McKinney became part of Republic Steel Corp. in 1935, the River Terminal Railway became a subsidiary of that company, with 1.5 mi. of main track connecting Republic's 2 open hearth blast furnaces on east side of the river. It continued to add sidings, locomotives, and freight cars to pick up iron ore from Republic's docks and move it to interchange points with other railroads, which then delivered it to plants in Warren and Youngstown. From these interchange points the railway would transport coal back to the mills. By 1972 it was moving 120 carloads of coal a day and 1.5 million tons of iron ore, as well as molten steel and finished products from one section of Republic's plant to another. The belt line also served chemical plants and other industries along the Cuyahoga River.

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Frontside: River Terminal Railroad Backside: River Terminal Railroad How the West was Won.

River Terminal Railway

Item: 10-R     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Nice block lettering and patina.
This Cleveland "Belt Line" was Chartered in 1909.

History - continued from above

In 1936 the River Terminal Railway purchased the first diesel locomotive in Cleveland, and by the late 1950s it had completed the switch from steam to diesel. In a dispute over safety regulations, 140 workers went on a weeklong strike over Republic's suspension of a conductor in 1944, forcing the total shutdown of Republic's mills, which employed 4,600 people. In 1983 the River Terminal Railway Co. became a subsidiary of the LTV Corp. as it remained in 1995, employing some 200 Clevelanders.

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Frontside: Rochester Railway Signal Co. Backside: Rochester Railway Signal Co. RRS Co.

Rochester Railway Signal Co. (RRS Co)

Item: 12-R     Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. For RRS Signal lock
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.
A early supplier of railway signaling equipment and locks.

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Frontside: Rutland Railroad Backside: Rutland Railroad Rutland R.R.Flag

Rutland Railroad

SOLD     New Listing     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and carmel patina.

History

The Rutland Railroad (reporting mark RUT) was a railroad in the northeastern United States, located primarily in the state of Vermont but extending into the state of New York at both its northern-most and southern-most ends. The earliest ancestor of the Rutland, the Rutland & Burlington Railroad, was chartered in 1843 by the state of Vermont to build between Rutland and Burlington. A number of other railroads were formed in the region, and by 1867 the Rutland & Burlington Railroad had changed its name to simply the Rutland Railroad

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Front Side: Rutland Railroad Backside: Rutland Railroad Rutland Alco No.207    Rutland R.R. coach

Rutland Railroad

SOLD     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and dark patina.
Oldie but goodie.

History - continued from above

The Rutland's primary freight traffic was derived from dairy products and to many Vermont natives the railroad is fondly remembered for the long trains of milk that used to move over the system. At its peak the Rutland served about a 400-mile system that roughly resembled an upside-down "L" running from Chatham, New York north to Alburgh, Vermont, (the railroad's northernmost terminus was Noyan, Quebec) and thence west to Ogdensburg, New York along the St. Lawrence River. Never a solid financial operation, the Rutland entered receivership for the first time in 1938. Cost cutting, including wage reduction, brought things around. A reorganization in 1950 changed the name from Rutland Railroad to Rutland Railway.

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Frontside: Rutland Railroad Backside: Rutland Railroad Rutland R.R.Flag

Rutland Railroad

Item: 16-R     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.

History - continued from above

After World War II the decline continued; many branches were closed down. In 1950 the company was reorganized as the Rutland Railway. The year 1953 brought three weeks of employee strike action, which killed off the remaining passenger service on the line.

In 1961 after further strikes the railroad apparently decided it was no longer viable and applied to the Interstate Commerce Commission for complete abandonment. This was approved, and the railroad closed down on May 20, 1963. The strike was brought on by the employees' unwillingness to accept changes that would have moved the center of operations from Rutland to Burlington, requiring them to relocate from Rutland to Burlington. A few years later the national unions agreed to nationwide job changes that allowed this type of change.

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S



Frontside: San Francisco Belt Railroad Backside: San Francisco Belt Railroad 1st State Belt R.R. 1913     State Belt R.R.

San Francisco Belt Railroad

Item: 3-S     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Niceb block lettering and gold patina.
Low serial #

History

The San Francisco Belt Railroad was a short-line railroad along the Embarcadero in San Francisco, California. It began as the State Belt Railroad in 1889, and was renamed when the city bought the Port of San Francisco in 1969. As a state owned enterprise, the railroad asserted several unsuccessful claims to immunity from federal regulation. The railroad ceased operation in 1993.

The railroad connected the Port of San Francisco to many waterfront docks and to industries and warehouses which were adjacent to the waterfront. In its early years it operated dual-gauged track to accommodate the North Pacific Coast and South Pacific Coast Railroads.

The San Francisco Bay Railroad has operated the port terminal line since 2000.

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Frontside: Sand Springs Railroad Backside: Sand Springs Railroad Sands Springs R.R. Flag

Sand Springs Railway Co.

Item: 7-S     Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Eagle Lock Co.
Superb block lettering and two-tone patina.
Oakie 32 mile short line.

History

The Sand Springs Railway (SS) is a class III railroad operating in Oklahoma. It began in 1911 as an interurban railway providing passenger service between Tulsa and Sand Springs. It soon developed a freight hauling business between the two cities. Passenger service was discontinued January 5, 1955, but the railroad has continued to operate until the present. On May 28, 2014, it was announced that the railroad would be acquired by OmniTRAX, with operations commencing no later than July 31, 2014. It provides freight rail service between Sand Springs and Tulsa over a 32 mile route. The company primarily hauls steel, pulp, scrap iron, scrap paper, petroleum products, plastic, and lumber. It interchanges with the Union Pacific Railroad, BNSF Railway and the South Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad.

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Frontside: San Pedro-Los Angeles & Salt Lake Backside: San Pedro-Los Angeles & Salt Lake SPLA&SL engine No.32      SLR R.R. Flag

San Pedro-Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad

Item: 9-S     Price: $265.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina. Key listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."
A rare 1!

History

The San Pedro-Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad, the first direct route from Salt Lake City to Los Angeles when it was completed in 1905, was perhaps the single most significant factor in the creation of what would become the city of Las Vegas, and later, Clark County.

Incorporated in Utah in 1901 as the San Pedro-Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad, the line was largely the brainchild of William Andrews Clark, a Montana mining baron and United States Senator. Clark enlisted the help of Utah's U.S. Senator Thomas Kearns, mining magnate and newspaper man, to ensure the success of the line through Utah. Construction of the railroad's main line was completed in 1905. Company shareholders adopted the LA&SL name in 1916. The railway was also known by its official nickname, "The Salt Lake Route," and was sometimes informally referred to as "The Clark Road." The tracks are still in use by the modern Union Pacific Railroad, as the Caliente and Lynndyl subdivisions.

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Frontside: Santa Fe Railroad Backside: Santa Fe Railroad Santa Fe R.R. Flag

Santa Fe Railroad

Item: 11-S     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Excellent deep stamp marks!

History

The Atchison-Topeka & Santa Fe Railway (ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas-Colorado border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy.

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Frontside: Santa Fe Railroad Backside: Santa Fe Railroad Santa Fe train

Santa Fe Railroad

Item: 12-S     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and dark patina.

History - continued from above

AT&SF reached Albuquerque in 1880; Santa Fe, the original destination of the railroad, found itself on a short branch from Lamy, New Mexico. In March 1881 AT&SF connected with the Southern Pacific (SP) at Deming, New Mexico, forming the second transcontinental rail route. The railroad then built southwest from Benson, Arizona, to Nogales on the Mexican border where it connected with the Sonora Railway, which the AT&SF had built north from the Mexican port of Guaymas.

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Frontside: Santa Fe Route Backside: Santa Fe Route Mexican railroad workers

Santa Fe Route

Item: 14-S     Price: $245.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Forged by the Slaymaker/Barry Co.
Superb bold serif lettering and carmel patina.
A well preserved SF key!

History - continued from above

The Santa Fe began to expand: a line from Barstow, California, to San Diego in 1885 and to Los Angeles in 1887; control of the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railway (Galveston-Fort Worth-Purcell) in 1886 and a line between Wichita and Fort Worth in 1887; lines from Kansas City to Chicago, from Kiowa, Kansas to Amarillo, and from Pueblo to Denver (paralleling the D&RGW) in 1888; and purchase of the Frisco and the Colorado Midland Railway in 1890. By January 1890, the entire system consisted of some 7,500 miles of track.

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Frontside: Backside: Santa Fe Railroad Santa Fe R.R. Flag

Santa Fe Railroad

Item: 15-S     New Listing     Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and two-tone patina.
Very early A&W hex stamp key. Nice!

History - continued from above

The Santa Fe was a pioneer in intermodal freight service, an enterprise that (at one time or another) included a tugboat fleet and an airline (the short-lived Santa Fe Skyway). Its bus line extended passenger transportation to areas not accessible by rail, and ferryboats on the San Francisco Bay allowed travelers to complete their westward journeys to the Pacific Ocean.

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Frontside: Savannah & Atlantic Railway Backside: Savannah & Atlantic Railway The Hotel Tybee    NS engine No.1065

Savannah & Atlantic Railway

Item: 18-S     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Ex-fine pocket wear and great carmel patina. Key listed
in the "American Railway's Switch Key Directory."

History

Popularly referred to as the “Tybee Branch” or “Tybee Railroad,” the Savannah and Atlantic Railroad was built in 1887, extending from Savannah to the main part of Tybee Island, a distance of 17.7 miles.

On July 16, 1917, the Savannah and Atlanta bought the Savannah and Northwestern, and thereafter the entire line of 141 miles became the Savannah and Atlanta. In 1921, the line was thrown into receivership, and in 1929 was bought by Robert M. Nelson. Mr. Nelson sold it to the Central in 1951 for $3,500,000.

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Frontside: Salt Lake-Garfield & Western Railway Backside: Salt Lake-Garfield & Western Railway SLG&W switcher    Saltair Resort in 1900

Salt Lake-Garfield & Western Railway

Item: 20-S     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Superb block lettering and patina.

History

The Salt Lake-Garfield & Western Railway (SLGW), nicknamed through most of its history as The Saltair Route, is a short line railroad located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Originally incorporated as a dual passenger and freight ailroad, it now provides freight-only railcar switching services to industries in Salt Lake City along its sixteen miles of track.

The SLG&W was incorporated on September 6, 1891 as the Saltair Railway, with the express purpose of tapping the tourist market visiting the Saltair Beach Resort on the shores of the Great Salt Lake. It was reorganized as the Salt Lake & Los Angeles Railroad in April 1892, and renamed soon after the Salt Lake-Garfield & Western Railway. The line carried passengers to Saltair and freight to the mining area of Garfield, Utah including Morton Salt located on the shores of the Great Salt Lake. On June 8, 1893, the Saltair Resort was officially opened. Saltair was founded and owned originally by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, but was later transferred to the railroad under the ownership of the Snow Family, and the railroad was sold to the Hogle family in the early 1960's.

The first diesel on the line was purchased in 1951, and was a GE 44-tonner. In July 1954 a head-on collision caused the railroad to lease a GE centercab diesel from U.S. Steel, and this unfortunate incident marked the end of electric operations on the SLG&W. The SLG&W continues to haul freight to this day along its 16 miles of track with additional sidings for railcar storage, transloading, railcar cleaning and other rail-related services.

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Frontside: Seaboard Airline Railroad Backside: Seaboard Airline Railroad SAL R.R. Flag

Seaboard Airline Railroad

Item: 22-S     New Listing     Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Great block lettering and gold patina.

History

The Seaboard Air Line Railroad (SAL), which styled itself "The Route of Courteous Service," was an American railroad whose corporate existence extended from April 14, 1900 until July 1, 1967, when it merged with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, its longtime rival, to form the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad. The company was headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia, until 1958, when its main offices were relocated to Richmond, Virginia. The Seaboard Air Line Railway Building in Norfolk's historic Freemason District still stands and has been converted to luxury apartments.

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Frontside: Seaboard Airline Railway Backside: Seaboard Airline Railway SAL train depot

Seaboard Airline Railway

Item: 23-S     New Listing     Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Excellent block lettering and carmel patina.

History

In the days before air travel, air line was a common term for the shortest distance between two points: a straight line drawn through the air (or on a map), ignoring natural obstacles (i.e. "as the crow flies"). Hence, a number of 19th century railroads used air line in their titles to suggest that their routes were shorter than those of competing roads. The Seaboard never owned an airplane. In 1940 the railroad proposed the creation of "Seaboard Airlines" but this idea was struck down by the Interstate Commerce Commission as violating federal anti-trust legislation.

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Frontside: Seaboard Coastline Railroad Backside: Seaboard Coastline Railroad SCL R.R. Flag      SCL R.R. Flag

Seaboard Coastline Railroad

Item: 25-S     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Although this key is stamped "SCL," the key has a
Atlantic Coastline style bit. Post merger key?

History

The Seaboard Coast Line emerged on July 1, 1967, following the merger of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. The combined system totaled 9,809 miles (15,786 km), the eighth largest in the United States at the time. The railroad had $1.2 billion in assets and revenue with a 54% market share of rail service in the Southeast, facing competition primarily from the Southern.

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Frontside: Seaboard Coastline Railroad Backside: Seaboard Coastline Railroad SCL station    SCL R.R. Flag    SCL trains

Seaboard Coastline Railroad

Item: 26-S     Price: $60.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and gold patina.

History - continued from above

Prior to the creation of Amtrak on May 1, 1971, the Seaboard Coast Line provided passenger service over much of its system, including local passenger trains on some lines. Local trains ended when the Amtrak era began. Although several named passenger trains survived through the Amtrak era, many were renamed or combined with other services.

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Frontside: Sioux City Terminal Railway Co. Backside: Sioux City Terminal Railway Co. Patton, Iowa depot    SCT unit grain train

Sioux City Terminal Railway Co.

SOLD     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The carrier was incorporated July 2, 1907, under the general laws of the State of Iowa, for the stated purpose of acquiring and operating terminal railroad tracks in Woodbury County, Iowa. It was organized July 3, 1907. The company owns 1.306 miles of first main and 1.235 miles of second main tracks, together with 10.591 miles of yard tracks and sidings. Its road thus embraces 13.132 miles of all tracks wholly owned and used, exclusive of the land and grading, which are leased from the Sioux City Stock Yards Company. The carrier is an industrial carrier. It is controlled by the Sioux City Stock Yards Company, and performs a switching service between the packing-house industries and the connecting railroads.

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Frontside: Seattle-Renton & Southern Railway Backside: Seattle-Renton & Southern Railway Washington Territory's first streetcar line    SR&S Ry

Seattle-Renton & Southern Railway

Item: 29-S     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's-early 1900's. Seattle interurban.
Attractive tapered ring barrel. Superb serif lettering
and patina. Over 100 years young - a real beauty!

History

The Seattle-Renton & Southern built King County's first true interurban railroad beginning in 1891, and spurred development of the then largely agricultural Rainier Valley. The line was begun by J. K. Edmiston and extended by W. J. Grambs, Frank Osgood (1852-1934), and W. R. Crawford. In 1912, its name was changed to the Seattle & Rainier Valley Railway. The line suffered from safety problems, lack of capital, and lax management. The City of Seattle attempted to buy it in 1914 and finally (in 1936) revoked its franchise. The last Renton inturban finished its run early on the morning of January 1, 1937. The rails were removed and paved over to widen Rainier Avenue S.

Ironically, hopes that the rail line would one day be extended farther south, perhaps to Puyallup, were never realized. This idea was the "southern" part of Seattle-Renton & Southern Railway.

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Frontside: South Buffalo Railway Backside: South Buffalo Railway SB engine No.90

South Buffalo Railway

Item: 30-S     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged?
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History

The South Buffalo Railway operates more than fifty miles of railway lines along the southeast shore of Lake Erie. South Buffalo connects to CSX, Norfolk Southern, Canadian Pacific, and Canadian National Railway.

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Frontside: South Georgia Railroad Backside: South Georgia Railroad South Georgia (2-2-6)

South Georgia Railway

Item: 33-S     Price: $85.00

Remarks: SG chartered in 1897. Adlake forged?
Superb block lettering and gold patina. In 1971 the
SG merged with the Live Oak-Perry & Gulf R.R.

History

Incorporated in 1896, the South Georgia Railroad opened its 28-mile railroad between Heartpine and Quitman in March of 1897. A 23-mile extension from Quitman to Greenville, Florida, opened in October of 1901.

In 1971 the South Georgia merged with the Live Oak-Perry & Gulf Railroad to form the Live Oak-Perry & South Georgia Railway, running from Adel to Perry. It was owned and operated by Southern Railway.

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Frontside: Southern Railroad Backside: Southern Railroad Sou R.R. Flag

Southern Railroad

Item: 35-S     eastern section key    Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's-early 1900's. Rare Fraim forged key.
Superb serif lettering and patina. This key stamped
"RR" + key below stamped "RY = nice set.

History

The Southern Railway (SOU) was a US class 1 railroad that was based in the Southern United States. It was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894.

Southern Railway came into existence in 1894 through the combination of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, the Richmond and Danville system and the East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad. The company owned two-thirds of the 4,400 miles of line it operated, and the rest was held through leases, operating agreements and stock ownership. Southern also controlled the Alabama Great Southern and the Georgia Southern and Florida, which operated separately, and it had an interest in the Central of Georgia. Additionally, the Southern Railway also agreed to lease the North Carolina Railroad Company, providing a critical connection from Virginia to the rest of the southeast via the Carolinas.

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Frontside: Southern Railway Backside: Southern Railway Southern Ry    NS engine No.8099

Southern Railway

Item: 36-S     New Listing     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Superb stamp marks.
This key stamped "RY" + key above
stamped "RR = nice set.

History - continued from above

Known as the "First Railroad War," the Civil War left the South's railroads and economy devastated. Most of the railroads, however, were repaired, reorganized and operated again. In the area along the Ohio River and Mississippi River, construction of new railroads continued throughout Reconstruction. The Richmond and Danville System expanded throughout the South during this period, but was overextended, and came upon financial troubles in 1893, when control was lost to financier J.P. Morgan, who reorganized it into the Southern Railway System.

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Frontside: Southern Railway Backside: Southern Railway Southern Ry    NS engine No.8099

Southern Railway

Item: 37-S     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Nice copper patina.
Superb block lettering.

History - continued from above

After the line from Meridian, Mississippi, to New Orleans, Louisiana was acquired in 1916 under Southern's president Fairfax Harrison, the railroad had assembled the 8,000-mile, 13-state system that lasted for almost half a century. Additionally, Southern have operated 6,791 miles of road at the end of 1925, but its flock of subsidiaries added 1000+ more. In 1912, the Southern Railway leased most of its Bluemont, Virginia, branch to the newly formed Washington and Old Dominion Railway. In 1945, the Southern sold most of the remnant of the branch to the Washington and Old Dominion Railroad, the successor to the Washington and Old Dominion Railway.

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Frontside: Southern Rail Lines Backside: Southern Rail Lines Sou R.R. Flag

Southern Rail Lines

Item: 38-S     New Listing     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Rare "Lines" key.
Superb serif lettering and patina. A beauty!

History - continued from above

The Southern tried to gain access to Chicago by targeting the Monon Railroad and the Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad but both those railroads went to Southern's competitor, the Louisville and Nashville.

In response to the creation of the CSX Corporation in November 1980, the Southern Railway joined forces with the Norfolk and Western Railway and formed the Norfolk Southern Corporation in 1980 which began operations in 1982, further consolidating railroads in the eastern half of the United States.The Southern Railway was renamed Norfolk Southern Railway as the Norfolk and Western Railway became a subsidiary to its system on June 1, 1982. The railroad then acquired more than half of Conrail on June 1, 1999.

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Frontside: South Omaha Terminal Railway Backside: South Omaha Terminal Railway USYofO 1941    Trucking livestock    Omaha stock yards.

South Omaha Terminal Railway Co.

Item: 41-S     Price: $110.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Excellent serif lettering and gold patina.
116yr. old stockyard institution closed in 1999.

History

The South Omaha Terminal Railway, a subsidiary of the Union Stock Yards Company of Omaha, was a spur line established to serve the Omaha stockyards, which opened in the 1880s. It was transformed into the South Omaha Terminal Railway in the 1920s. Because of the Stockyards, by the 1880s Omaha was served by every major railroad in the country. Other railroads in the city included the Omaha Road, Omaha, Lincoln and Beatrice Railway, Omaha Southern Railroad, Kansas, Nebraska and Omaha Railway, Omaha and Republican Valley Railway, Omaha and South Western Railroad and Omaha, Abilene and Wichita Railway.

The South Omaha Terminal Railway in Omaha, Nebraska was a subsidiary of the Union Stock Yards Company of Omaha. Until the separate railroad company was created in July 1927, the trackage, about 17 miles (27 km), was owned and operated directly by the Union Stock Yards Company of Omaha. On April 4, 1978, an Interstate Commerce Commission emergency service order was issued at which time the Brandon Corporation took over service.

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Frontside: Soo Line Railroad Backside: Soo Line Railroad Soo Line R.R. Flag

Soo Line Railroad

Item: 43-S     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina.

History

The Minneapolis-St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railroad (reporting mark SOO) was a Class I railroad subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the Midwest United States. Commonly known as the Soo Line after the phonetic spelling of Sault, it was merged with several other major CP subsidiaries on January 1, 1961 to form the Soo Line Railroad. As time passes, more and more Soo Line equipment is being repainted into the Canadian Pacific's current paint scheme, slowly erasing the Soo's identity as a subsidiary railroad.

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Frontside: Soo Line Railroad Backside: Soo Line Railroad Soo Line train

Soo Line Railroad

Item: 44-S     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Excellent serif lettering and superb gold patina.

History

The Minneapolis-St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railroad (reporting mark SOO) was a Class I railroad subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the Midwest United States. Commonly known as the Soo Line after the phonetic spelling of Sault, it was merged with several other major CP subsidiaries on January 1, 1961 to form the Soo Line Railroad. As time passes, more and more Soo Line equipment is being repainted into the Canadian Pacific's current paint scheme, slowly erasing the Soo's identity as a subsidiary railroad.

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Frontside: Soo Line Railroad Backside: Soo Line Railroad Soo Line R.R. Flag

Soo Line Railroad

Item: 45-S     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Adlake forged.
Great block lettering and superb gold patina.


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Frontside: Soo Line Railroad Backside: Soo Line Railroad Soo Line engines

Soo Line Railroad

Item: 46-S     Price: $25.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900's. KeLine forged.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.

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Frontside: Soo Line Railroad Backside: Soo Line Railroad Soo Line No.705

Soo Line Railroad

Item: 47-S     m = post merger key     Price: $40.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900's. KeLine forged.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.

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Frontside: South Pacific Railroad Backside: South Pacific Railroad SP R.R. Flag

South Pacific Railroad

Item: 50-S     New Listing     Price: $425.00

Remarks: Chartered in 1868. Western relic.
Superb stamped initials and patina. Very early
forged key with a copper alloy mix. Purchased by the
A&P, followed by the A&P being absorbed by the Frisco.

History

The South Pacific was a subsidiary of the Atlantic and Pacific (A&P) Railroad, a congressionally chartered concern backed by a million potential acres in federal land grants. It put hundreds of men to work building a bridge across the Gasconade and converting track from broad to standard gauge.

The company reached Springfield in 1869 and the western boundary of Missouri by 1870, thereby meeting the requirements of the state’s charter. The A&P bought the South Pacific to make up the eastern division of a transcontinental railway to California.

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Frontside: CP-SP Railroad Backside: CP-SP Railroad Completion of the Pacific Railroad    SP R.R. Flag    Central Pacific R.R. Flag    CP workcamp Nevada

Southern Pacific/Central Pacific Railroad

Item: 51-S     Price: $525.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Rare father & son keys.
Forged by the CP/Southern Pacific R.R.- Sacramento shops.
Tapered barrel, superb block lettering and carmel/gold patina.
Two well preserved beauties! Sold as a set only.

History

The Central Pacific Railroad (CPRR) is the former name of the railroad network built between California and Utah, US, that built eastwards from the West Coast in the 1860s, to complete the western part of the "First Transcontinental Railroad" in North America. It is now part of the Union Pacific Railroad.

In 1885 the Central Pacific Railroad was leased by the Southern Pacific Company. Technically the CPRR remained a corporate entity until 1959, when it was formally merged into Southern Pacific. It was reorganized in 1899 as the "Central Pacific "Railway." The original right-of-way is now controlled by the Union Pacific, which bought Southern Pacific in 1996.

The Union Pacific-Central Pacific (Southern Pacific) mainline followed the historic Overland Route from Omaha, Nebraska to San Francisco Bay.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad SP R.R. Flag

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 53-S     CS-4 (switch)     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's-early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb stamped initials and patina.
Nice SP oldie!

History

The Southern Pacific Transportation Company (SP), earlier Southern Pacific Railroad and Southern Pacific Company, and usually called the Southern Pacific or (from the railroad's initials) Espee, was an American Class I railroad. It was absorbed in 1988 by the company that controlled the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad. Eight years later the SP became part of the Union Pacific Railroad.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Lines Backside: Southern Pacific Lines SP yard switcher No.439    SP R.R. Flag    SP Roseville Yd.

Southern Pacific Lines

Item: 54-S     New     CS-4 (switch)     Listing     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and two-tone patina.

History - continued from above

The railroad was founded as a land holding company in 1865, later acquiring the Central Pacific Railroad by lease. By 1900 the Southern Pacific Company was a major railroad system incorporating many smaller companies, such as the Texas & New Orleans Railroad and Morgan's Louisiana & Texas Railroad. It extended from New Orleans through Texas to El Paso, across New Mexico and through Tucson, to Los Angeles, through most of California, including San Francisco and Sacramento. Central Pacific lines extended east across Nevada to Ogden, Utah, and reached north through Oregon to Portland. Other subsidiaries eventually included the St. Louis Southwestern Railway (Cotton Belt), the Northwestern Pacific Railroad at 328 miles, the 1,331 miles Southern Pacific Railroad of Mexico, and a variety of 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge routes.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad Murder in the Private Car    Murder in the Private Car    Murder in the Private Car

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 56-S     CS-4 (switch)     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb stamped initials and patina.

History - continued from above

Following some discussion around the details of the merger, it was decided that the Southern Pacific name would be put up for sale. Four years later, on October 13, 1988, the Southern Pacific Railroad was acquired by Rio Grande Industries. After taking control of the Southern Pacific and a long debate of what to do with it, it was decided that they would maintain the name Southern Pacific for the railroad operations. Even though Rio Grande Industries held good intentions for the Southern Pacific, it was taken over by the Union Pacific Railroad because of Rio Grande's financial difficulties.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad SP train derailment

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 57-S     New   CS-4 (switch)   Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the Cavanaugh Co.
Nice tapered barrel. Superb serif lettering and patina.
A rare 1!

History - continued from above

The Southern Pacific legacy founded hospitals in San Francisco, Tucson, Arizona, and elsewhere. In the 1970s, it also founded a telecommunications network with a state-of-the-art microwave and fiber optic backbone. This telecommunications network became part of Sprint, a company whose name came from the acronym for Southern Pacific Railroad Internal Networking Telephony.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Lines Backside: Southern Pacific Lines SP R.R. Flag

Southern Pacific Lines

Item: 58-S     CS-5 (switch)     Price: $100.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's.
Forged @ SP's Sacramento shop.
Great gold patina. Another nice SP oldie!

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad Murder in the Private Car    Murder in the Private Car    Murder in the Private Car

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 59-S     CS-24 (road & bridge)     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.
Nice R&B oldie!

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad SP engine No.4294    Cab forward girl    SP freight train

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 60-S     CS-24 (road & bridge)     Price: $90.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. Nice R&B oldie!
Unique "C" stamp.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad Postcard, Porterville, CA    Porterville, CA

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 61-S     CS-44 (MofW-special)     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad SP Pecos River Bridge    SP Pecos River Bridge    Pecos River High Bridge

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 62-S     CS-44 (MofW-special)     Price: $60.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Nice pocket worn block lettering and gold patina.
Pocket worn #44 on front.

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Frontside: Southern Pacific Railroad Backside: Southern Pacific Railroad Bldg. 1st  transcontinental R.R.

Southern Pacific (Company) Railroad

Item: 63-S     CS-47 (rip track)     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.

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Frontside: SP-UP Railroad's Backside: SP-UP Railroad's SP R.R. Flag    UP R.R. Flag

SP-UP Railroad's

Item: 64-S     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Nice serif lettering and patina.
Two railroad stamp marks. Commemorative?

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Frontside: Sodus Point & Southern Railroad Backside: Sodus Point & Southern Railroad Coal Trestle    Sodus Point    Sodus, ca. 1955

Sodus Point & Southern Railroad

Item: 66-S     Price: $375.00

Remarks: Chartered in 1852. Coal hauling line.
Superb serif lettering and patina.
Absorbed into the Pennsy. A rare 1!

History

Reorganized in 1875 with the Geneva-Hornellsville & Pine Creek Railroad. In 1882 became the Sodus Bay & Southern Railroad. In 1884 the Northern Central Railroad bought the Sodus Point & Southern Railroad, creating a land-water shipping route from Pennsylvania to Canada.

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Frontside: Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railroad Backside: Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railroad SP&S R.R. Flag

Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railroad

Item: 68-S     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and gold patina.

History

The Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railway (SP&S) was a United States-based railroad incorporated in 1905. It was a joint venture by the Great Northern Railway and the Northern Pacific Railway to build a railroad along the north bank of the Columbia River. Remnants of the line are currently operated by BNSF Railway.

The railroad was chartered in 1905 by James J. Hill to connect the two transcontinental railroads owned by him, the Northern Pacific (NP) and Great Northern (GN), to Portland, Oregon from Spokane, Washington, to gain a portion of the lumber trade in Oregon, a business then dominated by E.H. Harriman's Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads. In January 1908 "Spokane" was added to the railroad's name, making it the Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railway.

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Frontside: Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railroad Backside: Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railroad SP&S engine No.525 & crew

Spokane-Portland & Seattle Railroad

Item: 69-S     Price: $45.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Great Block lettering and gold patina.
Unique flaired hilt.

History - continued from above

During World War II the SP&S carried war materials to the Pacific Theatre; new industries located along the Columbia River, taking advantage of cheap electricity from hydroelectric dams on the river. New industries served by the SP&S included aluminum plants, sawmills, chemical factories and grain elevators.

In 1954 an SP&S train derailed after hitting a rockslide on the route to Bend, Oregon. Part of the train landed in the Deschutes River, including a boxcar, which landed in a rapid that was later named "Boxcar Rapids" after the incident, which killed all crew members.

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Frontside: Stony Creek Railroad Backside: Stony Creek Railroad P&R R.R. Flag

Stony Creek Railroad

Item: 71-S     Price: $145.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's-early 1900's. Once operated by the P&R.
Superb serif lettering and patina. Passenger station was located
at Markley and Main streets. Another rare beauty!

History

Information taken from Google Books dated 1901: The Stony Creek Railroad extended from Norristown to the borough of Lansdale, where it connected with the North Pennsylvania Railroad. At Norristown, by means of the Junction road, it connected with the Philadelphia-Germantown & Norristown Railroad, thus forming a continupus line from Philadelphia to Lansdale. All the roads mentioned were once operated by the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company. A facility for turning the engines was erected on the land of the Stony Creek Railroad Company. The turntable had been in use for upward of thirty years. The news document then stated, the Stony Creek Railroad petioned the state to build a track commencing at a point on their line opposite their turntable to connect with the siding of the Adam Scheidt Brewing Company.

The Stony Creek Railroad ran from Norristown to Lansdale (still used for freight). The primary attraction of this line was service to Merck, which lies right on it; with a busier Bethlehem Branch beyond Lansdale, it would also function as an express cutoff avoiding traffic snarls downstream (particularly in the busy two-track section between Jenkintown and Wayne Jct.).

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Frontside: Strouds Creek & Muddlety Railroad Backside: Strouds Creek & Muddlety Railroad SC&M engine No.4

Strouds Creek & Muddlety Railroad

Item: 74-S     Price: $100.00

Remarks: West Virginia short line chartered in 1905
Superb serif lettering and patina.

History

Located in southeastern West Virginia, the SC&M was incorporated on June 14, 1904, under general laws of West Virginia, for the purpose of building a railroad from Allingdale, in a general northwesterly direction, to Delphi, a distance of 8.437 miles. The carrier also owned 2.474 miles of yard tracks and sidings. Its road thus once embraced 10.911 miles of all tracks owned and used. In addition to its owned property, the carrier leased from The Birch Valley Lumber Company certain shop buildings located at Tioga, W. Va., one motor car and all of its equipment. The SC&M granted trackage rights to The Birch Valley Lumber Company for the operation of log trains between Tioga and Delphi, W. Va., a distance of about 2 miles. The SC&M once shared jointly with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company the latter's station facilities at Allingdale, W. Va. An industrial railroad, it was controlled by the Tioga Lumber Company. The road principally served as an outlet for the timber of The Birch Valley Lumber Company, a corporation which purchased the timber property formerly owned by the Tioga Lumber Company. Most if not all of the line was abandoned in the late 1900's.

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Frontside: Strasburg Railroad Backside: Strasburg Railroad ST. R.R. Flag

Strasburg Railroad

Item: 75-S     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina. Key listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."
Same style bit as a Cornwall key.

History

The Strasburg Rail Road is the oldest continuously operating railroad in the western hemisphere and the oldest public utility in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Chartered in 1832, the Strasburg Rail Road continues to operate under its original charter and original name (Strasburg Rail Road Company). Located just outside of the town of Strasburg, Pennsylvania, the railroad is a heritage railroad offering excursion trains, hauled by steam locomotives, through the heart of world-famous Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Strasburg currently has four (4) serviceable historic steam locomotives (Canadian National 7312, Canadian National 89, Great Western 90, N&W 475) on its roster and has the nation's largest fleet of historic wooden passenger coaches in operation.

Strasburg Rail Road is a shortline railroad whose construction in the 19th century was intended to connect the town of Strasburg with the main line. Today, the original 4 1/2 mile line carries passengers on a 45-minute round-trip journey from Strasburg to Leaman Place Junction through nearly 1,000 acres in south-eastern Lancaster County.

In addition to the excursion train rides, Strasburg Rail Road mechanical and car shops conduct contract work for a wide variety of public and private clients including fellow steam railroads, train museums, attractions, and more. Strasburg Rail Road's freight department facilitates the carrying of goods to and from the main line for a number of local and regional clients. In 2016, it was announced that they are to expand their shop an extra 12,000 square feet due to the increase of jobs from other railroads.

The Strasburg Rail Road is also one of the few railroads in the United States to occasionally use steam locomotives to haul revenue freight trains.

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Frontside: St. Johnsbury & Lamoille County Railroad Backside: St. Johnsbury & Lamoille County Railroad StJ&LC

St. Johnsbury & Lamoille County Railroad

Item: 76-S     Price: $325.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. The stamped "1" = bit number.
Attractive tapered ring barrel. Superb serif lettering and patina.
Has the characteristics of a Slaymaker-Barry forged key.

History

The St. Johnsbury & Lamoille County Railroad (StJ&LC) was constructed in the 1870s as the Vermont Division of the Portland & Ogdensburg Railway to connect the Great Lakes with the seaport of Portland, Maine. The westerly connection with the Great Lakes was never made. The eastern end of the Vermont Division was leased to the Maine Central Railroad in 1912, and the remainder of the line became a subsidiary of the Boston & Maine Railroad. The Boston & Maine operated their segment as the St. Johnsbury & Lake Champlain Railroad after 1925. This segment was reorganized as the St. Johnsbury & Lamoille County Railroad in 1948.

The State of Vermont purchased the line from Samuel Pinsley in 1973. The line was then operated by Morrison-Knudsen as the Vermont Northern Railroad for a time. In 1978, local shippers took over the operation and it became the Lamoille Valley Railroad. In 1989, the line was leased to a Florida company and was operated by them until major flooding in 1995 and 1997 damaged the line so much that it was not profitable to repair the track. In 2002, the state of Vermont started converting the 96 mile route into a recreational trail and created the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail.

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Frontside: St. Louis & Southwestern Railway Backside: St. Louis & Southwestern Railway SSW R.R. Flag

St. Louis & Southwestern Railway

Item: 79-S     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Superb serif lettering and patina. Key listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."
Given the moniker, "The Cotton Belt."

History

The Cotton Belt was one of the lines comprising the railroad empire acquired by financier Jay Gould in the last quarter of the 19th century; according to the Handbook of Texas, "By 1890 Gould owned the Missouri Pacific, the Texas and Pacific, the St. Louis Southwestern, and the International-Great Northern, one-half of the mileage in the Southwest.

The railroad was organized on January 15, 1891, although it had its origins in a series of short lines founded in Tyler, Texas, in 1870 that connected northeastern Texas to Arkansas and southeastern Missouri. Construction of the original Tyler Tap Railroad began in the summer of 1875.

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Frontside: St. Louis & Southwestern Railway Backside: St. Louis & Southwestern Railway St. Louis, Missouri R.R. strike

St. Louis & Southwestern Railway Co.

Item: 80-S     New Listing     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Excellent block lettering. Key style listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."
Attractive brass/steel combo.

History - continued from above

The Southern Pacific Company gained Interstate Commerce Commission approval to control the Cotton Belt system on April 14, 1932, but continued to operate it as a separate company until 1992, when the SP consolidated the Cotton Belt's operations into the parent company. Cotton Belt diesel locomotives from 1959 on were painted in Southern Pacific's "bloody nose" scheme - dark gray locomotive body with a red "winged" nose. "Cotton Belt" was painted on the sides and in later years the letters "SSW" were painted on the nose.

In 1996 the Union Pacific Railroad finished the acquisition that was effectively begun almost a century before with the purchase of the Southern Pacific by UP in 1901, until divestiture was ordered in 1913. The merged company retains the name "Union Pacific" for all railroad operations.

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Frontside: St. Louis & Southwestern Railroad Backside: St. Louis & Southwestern Railroad SSW R.R. Flag

St. Louis & Southwestern Railroad

Item: 81-S     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Elongated barrel.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.
Same style bit as a Texas Midland key.
A rare 1!

Item of Interest

The Texas Midland was sold to the Southern Pacific Railroad on April 1, 1928. The Southern Pacific leased the Texas Midland to the Texas and New Orleans Railroad for operation. The Texas Midland was dissolved on June 30, 1934 when the Southern Pacific sold it to the Texas and New Orleans Railroad. Not to forget, the Southern Pacific Railroad owned the Cotton Belt (SSW).

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Frontside: St. Louis & O'Fallon Railway Backside: St. Louis & O'Fallon Railway St. Louis

St. Louis & O'Fallon Railway

Item: 83-S     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Nine mile Illinois short line.
Block lettering and rustic gold patina.

History

St. Louis & O"Fallon, a short line built at the suggestion of the city of St. Louis to provide an additional outlet for freight. The StL&O'F right of way paralleled the present Metrolink eastern extension at St. Clair Avenue. The carrier was incorporated June 1, 1896, under the general laws of Illinois. The owned main line extends eastwardly from East St. Louis to O'Fallon Mine No. 2, a distance of 8.939 miles. The carrier also owns and uses 11.131 miles of yard tracks and sidings. Its road thus embraces 20.070 miles of all tracks owned.

John O'Fallon (1791-December 17, 1865) was a businessman, philanthropist, and military officer. During the 19th century he rose to become the wealthiest person in St. Louis, Missouri. He is the namesake of O'Fallon, Illinois, (incorporated in 1874) as well as O'Fallon, Missouri and the nephew of William Clark.

He was especially active in railroad-building. O'Fallon presided over the 1849 committee which formed the Pacific Railroad (now Missouri Pacific Railroad); was the first president of the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad (now Baltimore and Ohio Railroad) and in 1850 became president of and the North Missouri Railroad (nee - Wabash Railroad).

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Frontside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad Backside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad Frisco R.R. Flag

St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad

Item: 85-S     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Nice block lettering and superb patina! Unique style key
has a smaller barrel opening than all Frisco keys below.
This key stamped "R.R." + key below stamped "RY" = nice set.

History

The "St. Louis & San Francisco Railway," aka Frisco, was a railroad that operated in the Midwest and South Central U.S. from 1876 to April 17, 1980. Incorporated in Missouri on September 7, 1876. It was formed from the Missouri Division and Central Division of the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. The Acheson-Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, interested in the A & P right of way across the Mojave Desert to California, took the road over until the larger road went bankrupt in 1893; the receivers retained the western right of way but divested the ATSF of the St. Louis-San Francisco mileage on the great plains. The St. Louis-San Francisco Railway had two main lines: St. Louis-Tulsa-Oklahoma City and Kansas City-Memphis-Birmingham. The junction of the two lines was in Springfield, Missouri, home to the company's main shop facility and headquarters.

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Frontside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Backside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Opening - Frisco Bridge

St. Louis-San Francisco Railway

Item: 86-S     W = Western Division     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice pocket worn block lettering and gold patina. This key
stamped "RY" + key above stamped "R.R." = nice set.

History - continued from above

The Atlantic & Pacific Railroad (A&P) was chartered in 1866 to build west from Springfield, Missouri, along the 35th parallel of latitude (approximately through Amarillo, Texas, and Albuquerque, New Mexico) to a junction with the SP at the Colorado River. The infant A&P had no rail connections. The line that was to become the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway.

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Frontside: SSt. Louis-San Francisco Railroad Backside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad Frisco R.R.    Frisco R.R. bridge

St. Louis-San Francisco Railway

Item: 87-S     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina.
Nice A&W hex stamp!

History - continued from above

The city of Frisco,Texas was named after the railroad and uses the former railroad's logo as its own logo. The logo is modeled after a stretched-out raccoon skin (giving rise to Frisco High School's mascot, the Fighting Raccoons). From March, 1917, through January, 1959, Frisco, in a joint venture with the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad, operated the Texas Special. This luxurious train, a streamliner from 1947, ran from St. Louis to Dallas,Texas, Ft. Worth, Texas and San Antonio, Texas. While the Texas Special was the most famous passenger train Frisco ever operated, it also rostered an entire fleet of (11) named trains. Due to the harsh economic conditions of that era, the Frisco merged into the Burlington Northern Railroad on November 21, 1980.

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Frontside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Backside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Frisco R.R. earthquake damage

St. Louis-San Francisco Railway

Item: 88-S     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and carmel patina.
Nice A&W hex stamp!

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Frontside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Backside: St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Lincoln Funeral Train

St. Louis-San Francisco Railway

Item: 89-S     New Listing     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and two-tone patina.
Different but nice - no letter "T" stamp.

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Frontside: St. Louis National Stock Yards Backside: St. Louis National Stock Yards St. Louis National Stock Yards

St. Louis National Stock Yards

Item: 91-S     New   cattle yard key   Listing     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged.
Excellent block lettering and dark patina.
With a serial #2, a big shot must've owned this key.
This key + SY key below = nice set!

History

The National Stockyards earned its name in the meat industry. The more than 656-acre industrial zone, one of America’s largest, processed millions of animals each year, set daily market prices for meat and shipped it to consumers across the country. Companies at the Stockyards were among St. Clair County’s biggest employers in the previous century, but it seemed like their glory days were always behind them. Yearly production declined for decades, and the yards eventually succumbed to economic changes..

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Frontside: St. Louis National Stock Yards Backside: St. Louis National Stock Yards St. Louis National Stock Yards

St. Louis National Stock Yards

Item: 92-S     New   hog house key   Listing     Price: $225.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Great block lettering and patina.
This key + SY key above = nice set!

History

National City was a suburb of East St. Louis, Illinois. Incorporated in 1907, it was a company town for the St. Louis National Stockyards Company. In 1996, the company, which owned all residential property in the town, evicted all of its residents. The following year, because it had no residents, National City was dissolved by court order. Its site was subsequently annexed by nearby Fairmont City, Illinois.

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Frontside: Sunbury Hazleton & Wilkesbarre Railway Backside: Sunbury Hazleton & Wilkesbarre Railway Wilkes-Barre

Sunbury Hazleton & Wilkesbarre Railway

Item: 94-S     Price: $215.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Pennsylvania coal hauler.
Attractive ring tapered barrel. 139 years young!
Superb serif lettering and patina.
Great serial #99!

History

The Danville-Hazleton & Wilkes-Barre Railroad began in April 1859 as the Wilkes-Barre & Pittston Railroad. Their plan was to build a railroad along the east side of the Susquehanna River from above Pittston to Danville or Sunbury. It was renamed the Danville-Hazleton & Wilkes-Barre Railroad in 1867. Railroad construction began in late 1867 or early 1868. Simon P. Kase was a critical force in the building of the railroad. In 1870 an anthracite-burning locomotive was built for the railroad. By 1870, the Danville-Hazleton & Wilkes-Barre Railroad linked Sunbury and Danville. By 1871, the railroad extended 43 miles from Sunbury to Tomhicken. In 1872, the Philadelphia & Erie Railroad started to operate the Danville-Hazleton & Wilkes-Barre tracks. In 1878, the railroad was sold under foreclosure and the name was changed to the Sunbury Hazleton & Wilkesbarre Railroad.

The Sunbury Line was once owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad connecting its core system with the other anthracite rail lines in and around Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. It is presently owned and operated by Norfolk Southern Railway.

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Frontside: Susquehanna & New York Railroad Backside: Susquehanna & New York Railroad S&NY R.R. Flag

Susquehanna & New York Railroad

Item: 95-S     Price: $150.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the FS Hdw. Co.?
Nice serif lettering and gold patina. This lines' iron
rails and rolling stock aided the war effort of WWll.
NY state short line. Nice oldie!

History

The Susquehanna and New York Railroad (reporting mark S&NY) was a short-line railroad connecting the Lehigh Valley Railroad at Towanda, Pennsylvania with the Pennsylvania Railroad at Marsh Hill Junction. The railroad carried freight and passengers between Williamsport and Towanda by rail rather than using the Susquehanna River or the Pennsylvania Canal.

The railroad, 45 miles in length in Northeastern Pennsylvania was originally built to carry timber and coal out of the Barclay Mountain (also called the South Mountain range of the Alleghenies to Towanda where these products could then be shipped by river or rail.

As with many railroads, the S&NY formed from an earlier company, absorbed companies during its heyday, and was later itself absorbed before being torn up to help with the war effort during World War II. On May 23, 1942 the S&NY made its last scheduled run. The rails between Monroeton and Ralston were taken up shortly afterward to run tracks throughout a large munitions plant at White Deer (near Williamsport). That is, the rails were used within the plant to move materials through the manufacturing process. So the S&NY ended its life to support World War II (WWII). The rails between Towanda and Monroeton were bought by the Lehigh Valley Railroad

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Frontside: Sumpter Valley Railroad Backside: Sumpter Valley Railroad SV R.R. Flag

Sumpter Valley Railroad

Item: 96-S     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Oregon logging short line.
Nice block lettering and dark patina. Key listed in the
"American Railway's Switch Key Directory."

History

The railway was incorporated in 1890 by David Eccles. The 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge railway's purpose was to haul logs to the Oregon Lumber Company sawmill in South Baker City. The sawmill and railroad remained separate corporations of the same owners for the life of the railroad. The builders of the railway also owned the Grande Ronde Lumber Company in Perry, Oregon, and the railway was financed by Mormons in Utah. The line was built over terrain originally considered as part of a railway from Denver, Colorado to the Pacific coast; but the Union Pacific Railroad opted for a different route to avoid bypassing growing communities which might provide an attractive opportunity for competition by the rapidly growing Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company.

Built on a right-of-way used by the original railway of the same name, it carries excursion trains on a roughly 5-mile route between McEwen and Sumpter.

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Frontside: Slaymaker #25 Backside: Slaymaker #25

Slaymaker #25

Item: 97-S     Price: $25.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Signal key for unknown railroad.

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Dates quoted for keys are approximate dates. Railroad switch keys initials (reporting mark) are assumed to be correct and accurate.
Comments on any railroad initials origin, including (typos), are welcome. Last update 10/02/2019

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